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Does anybody have performance experience of Nitrogen fill in the tires on a Terrain?
 

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wbassnp007 said:
Does anybody have performance experience of Nitrogen fill in the tires on a Terrain?
No, smoother ride here.
 

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IMO nitrogen filled tires are a scam, since the air coming out of a compressor is 78% nitrogen already......
 

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Mobius said:
IMO nitrogen filled tires are a scam, since the air coming out of a compressor is 78% nitrogen already......
So regular fuel is a scam since the octane is already 87 in regular fuel ?

I am using it, and it gives a smoother ride and less deflation due to time.

And Constant pressure no matter if -30 in winter or 30 in summer.
 

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yea its a scam, unless you drive on the surface of the moon with several hundred degree temperature changes.....if its free, cool, but no way im paying extra
 

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It cant hurt to have Nitrogen in the tires. My mother tried it one time and wasn't able to tell a difference in the ride of her car. The longer life and more consistent air pressure is a bonus though. This is an issue that some will swear by and others will dismiss as a scam. To each his own.... I don't think its worth it personally unless the dealer or tire shop will put it in for free.
 

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mstang66guy said:
It cant hurt to have Nitrogen in the tires. My mother tried it one time and wasn't able to tell a difference in the ride of her car. The longer life and more consistent air pressure is a bonus though. This is an issue that some will swear by and others will dismiss as a scam. To each his own.... I don't think its worth it personally unless the dealer or tire shop will put it in for free.
The consistance in air pressure is important. The more your tires are low profile the more the constant air pressure is important.

If you have 32 psi when cold it can go up to 35~40 when hot. It can result in a blew tire in summer when outside temperature is high.

The difference in air pressure can also be feeled in the steering... unbalanced tire feeling when temperature changes are not equal in all 4 tires.
 

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SuperMat64 said:
If you have 32 psi when cold it can go up to 35~40 when hot. It can result in a blew tire in summer when outside temperature is high.
Im not sure of the air pressure ratings on the Hankooks and Michelins but I hope they can handle more than 35-40 psi before a blow out...
 

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SuperMat64 said:
Sorry, I should rephrase. Charging $30-50 dollars per tire for 22% more nitrogen is a scam. I've never personally seen any company offer it for free (even if they claim it is free, it is usually only so if you purchase your tires at that location or whatnot, and you end up paying for it anyways). I don't see how the benefits are worth that price, especially for the average consumer.

I am using it, and it gives a smoother ride and less deflation due to time.

And Constant pressure no matter if -30 in winter or 30 in summer.
I highly doubt that you can feel the difference. I've had nitrogen filled tires (on a few different vehicles, with tire size ranging from 225/70/15's to 285/30/18's and I could not quantify a noticeable change.)
 

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Mobius said:
Sorry, I should rephrase. Charging $30-50 dollars per tire for 22% more nitrogen. I've never personally seen any company offer it for free (even if they claim it is free, it is usually only so if you purchase your tires at that location or whatnot, and you end up paying for it anyways). I don't see how the benefits are worth that price, especially for the average consumer.
30-50$ per tire ? you crazy ? Here they charge 3 to 5$ per tire.
 

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SuperMat64 said:
30-50$ per tire ? you crazy ? Here they charge 3 to 5$ per tire.
I'm not crazy, the dealership and tire shops are crazy. When I had the tires winter tires swapped over on our Terrain for the first time, they tacked on $120.00 for the nitrogen. I had a fit, and now I make sure to specify for them to use compressed air only. I was quoted a similar price a few years ago as well, from a different tire shop.
 

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mstang66guy said:
Im not sure of the air pressure ratings on the Hankooks and Michelins but I hope they can handle more than 35-40 psi before a blow out...
they will....granted it was on my work truck (3500 diesel econoline), but i had two new fronts put on, was driving back from the shop, and it was pulling hard to the left.....dorve a little ways feelin her out.....i got out, checked the pressure.....115psi in a 60psi tire......i called and ripped them a new one....

a tire isnt going to blow out for an extra 15-20% pressure....
 

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Mobius said:
I'm not crazy, the dealership and tire shops are crazy. When I had the tires winter tires swapped over on our Terrain for the first time, they tacked on $120.00 for the nitrogen. I had a fit, and now I make sure to specify for them to use compressed air only. I was quoted a similar price a few years ago as well, from a different tire shop.
Sorry about that. I never wanted to say you are crazy. I was speaking about the price. Sorry for my english :)
 
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Mobius said:
Sorry, I should rephrase. Charging $30-50 dollars per tire for 22% more nitrogen is a scam. I've never personally seen any company offer it for free (even if they claim it is free, it is usually only so if you purchase your tires at that location or whatnot, and you end up paying for it anyways). I don't see how the benefits are worth that price, especially for the average consumer.

I highly doubt that you can feel the difference. I've had nitrogen filled tires (on a few different vehicles, with tire size ranging from 225/70/15's to 285/30/18's and I could not quantify a noticeable change.)
You will notice little difference on nitrogen vs air. Someone who actually watches tire pressures will get the same fuel efficiency gained from (not the nitrogen) properly inflated tires. That includes improved tire wear. The issue is most people do a few things, do not use quality stores that do not have water blowing out of the lines (do not have good compressor system with properly sized dryer), and then never check tire pressures. If you go to a mom-pop location, I would watch the air, if you go to a more well known location, they should have a proper;u designed compressor system setup, and you will have no issues getting air vs nitrogen. Then if you check pressures, you are fine. P tires come in (2) types, SL and XL. Standard tires carry max load @ 36psi, and have max psi rating of 44psi. The XL will carry max loads at 44psi, and have max psi rating of 52. Unless you runing @ fully GVWR you will never blow out your tire running the max psi it was designed ofr, and variations in pressure based on temp will never cause this to happen, tires fail because of being UNDER inflated (which caused the tire to flex in areas not designed, which causes hot pockets in the tire, which causes the tire to fail) IF you running at max gvwr than you should run a max of 35-36psi, which is normally what the manufactures have as the recommended cold inflation pressure.
 
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2010BlkGraniteNox said:
You will notice little difference on nitrogen vs air. Someone who actually watches tire pressures will get the same fuel efficiency gained from (not the nitrogen) properly inflated tires. That includes improved tire wear. The issue is most people do a few things, do not use quality stores that do not have water blowing out of the lines (do not have good compressor system with properly sized dryer), and then never check tire pressures. If you go to a mom-pop location, I would watch the air, if you go to a more well known location, they should have a proper;u designed compressor system setup, and you will have no issues getting air vs nitrogen. Then if you check pressures, you are fine. P tires come in (2) types, SL and XL. Standard tires carry max load @ 36psi, and have max psi rating of 44psi. The XL will carry max loads at 44psi, and have max psi rating of 52. Unless you runing @ fully GVWR you will never blow out your tire running the max psi it was designed ofr, and variations in pressure based on temp will never cause this to happen, tires fail because of being UNDER inflated (which caused the tire to flex in areas not designed, which causes hot pockets in the tire, which causes the tire to fail) IF you running at max gvwr than you should run a max of 35-36psi, which is normally what the manufactures have as the recommended cold inflation pressure.
And just so we clear on things....The TIRE has nothing to do with the amount it can carry. The tire is designed to do one thing, and that is be vessel for air. The air pressure is what controls how much load we can carry, this applies more to the medium/heavy/OTR tire line-up, but the same tire depending on position can carry multiple different loads based on airpressure.
 

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2010BlkGraniteNox said:
And just so we clear on things....The TIRE has nothing to do with the amount it can carry.
Not quite. Different tires have different load capacities at different pressures, due to variances in how the tires are manufactured. For instance, a bicycle tire @ 35 PSI does not have the same rated load capacity as a passenger car tire at 35 PSI. And passenger car tire A @ 35 PSI may have a different load capacity than truck tire A @ 35 PSI (even though they may even be the same size).
 
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Mobius said:
Not quite. Different tires have different load capacities at different pressures, due to variances in how the tires are manufactured. For instance, a bicycle tire @ 35 PSI does not have the same rated load capacity as a passenger car tire at 35 PSI. And passenger car tire A @ 35 PSI may have a different load capacity than truck tire A @ 35 PSI (even though they may even be the same size).
Your talking different classes of tires.......In each of those classes that effects the tire load capability is AIR pressure, not the tire itself. Certain tires are not rated to go above certain psi (this comes into construction of tire, not enough plys (bias) or ply rating (radial)). Thats why its IMPORTANT to understand what type of tire we talking about, P (passenger), LT (light truck and lots of law suits because some heavy SUVs require LT when people installed P series), then it gets into the commerical truck industry. I give tire construction classes and out of service classes to DOT, fleets and dealers......And there is always someone who ask this exact question in similar faction. The answer is simple, a BIKE doesnt have the GVWR of a CAR, and thus are not in the same class, and can not be compared. You show me a bike that has a GVWR of 5000lbs, and I will show you tires installed that are exactly the same P series as a car, and following the same standard. But I would feel really sorry for the poor soul that much pedal that
 

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You just proved my point for me. The tires do make a difference, because you have to have the correct tires to handle a given load at a given pressure. Pretty simple concept. Even within the same class of tires, each type of tire has a load rating at a certain pressure. For instance, a P tire with a load rating of 71 has a load capacity of 761 lbs at rated pressure. A P tire with load rating of 110 has a load capacity of 2337 lbs at rated pressure. And I realize that the rated pressures will be different, because you are right that the air pressure is what affects the amount of load a tire can carry. However, the tire DOES make a difference because it defines how much pressure can be used.
 
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