GMC Terrain, Equinox, and SRX Forum banner

1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2010 gmc terrain 2.4, while i do like the vehicle and it only has 114000 on it i found out i have a shop bill for several thousand dollars because the direct injection is causing extreme buildup. Can anyone inform me of any type of claims or anything that could help me recoup some of or all of this money ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,119 Posts
is the carbon buildup giving you issues? Check engine light? Misfires?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
It sounds like the buildup that your talking about is carbon buildup on the backside of the intake valves. And yes this is very common with GDI ( Gasoline Direct Injection ) engines. ( Volkswagon and BMW have a history of this ) It is not a common complaint with the 2.4L Ecotec engine but it does happen. I'm not aware of any recalls or ways to recoup the costs. Maybe shop around for a cheaper price to do the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,506 Posts
So, the shop did the work without your authorization? Or you told them to do a couple thousand dollars worth of work without knowing what the work was ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
I have a 2010 gmc terrain 2.4, while i do like the vehicle and it only has 114000 on it i found out i have a shop bill for several thousand dollars because the direct injection is causing extreme buildup. Can anyone inform me of any type of claims or anything that could help me recoup some of or all of this money ?
How much is "several thousand dollars"? Is this build up causing noticeable drivability problems, or is the shop simply using this as an excuse to try and get money for something that isn't needed but being proposed due to vehicle age/mileage?

There are products on the market that allow people to reduce the buildup themselves at home. For example:

It can also be helpful to run a bottle of Techron fuel system cleaner concentrate at least once a year a couple of weeks before an oil change. While it won't fully eliminate carbon buildup, it can help reduce it.

Unless there is something majorly wrong with the engine, I would be skeptical of spending "several thousand dollars" worrying about carbon build-up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
How much is "several thousand dollars"? Is this build up causing noticeable drivability problems, or is the shop simply using this as an excuse to try and get money for something that isn't needed but being proposed due to vehicle age/mileage?

There are products on the market that allow people to reduce the buildup themselves at home. For example:

It can also be helpful to run a bottle of Techron fuel system cleaner concentrate at least once a year a couple of weeks before an oil change. While it won't fully eliminate carbon buildup, it can help reduce it.

Unless there is something majorly wrong with the engine, I would be skeptical of spending "several thousand dollars" worrying about carbon build-up.
Yeah, i checked alldataDIY for a valve cleaning/resurfacing and it quoted about 13 hours of work. Even at $50 an hour that wouldn't result in thousands of dollars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,642 Posts
Different parts of the country will vary.
Here in AZ, 50 miles from Mexico, my dealer O'Rielly Chevrolet is $126 per flat rate hour last time I checked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
You'll have to ask GM, but if there were any program to cost-share, I'm sure the dealer would have told you, unless you went to an independent mechanic. Carbon buildup is just a fact-of-life when it comes to GDI, it's caused by the suspended solids in the PCV gases, settling out on your intake valves, and not having the benefit of being washed away by gasoline in the airstream, since gas is injected directly into the cylinder. Toyota now does both port and GDI to help solve this problem. Another common issue with the Ecotec 4 cylinder engine is the orifice that sucks in the crankcase gases in the intake manifold, is only about 1/8" (1mm) in diameter, and can get clogged up, and that causes pressure build-up in the crankcase, and can blowout the rear main seal. You'll know if this happens because you'll be leaving a puddle of oil everywhere you park. Unfortunately, the orifice can only be gotten to if you remove the intake manifold; that's about 3 hours of labor, and a mechanic would likely change the gaskets which are about $50 for the set.

But what did the mechanic do exactly, and did you use a dealership?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
You'll have to ask GM, but if there were any program to cost-share, I'm sure the dealer would have told you, unless you went to an independent mechanic.
Dealers are unfortunately not that willing to freely admit to customers that there may be extended warranties or "service campaigns" available on certain problems. Even if you know about the campaigns and bring them to the attention of the dealer, they will try to get out of honoring them by claiming your issue is unrelated or "not covered in this situation". Sometimes you really have to push the issue to receive the coverage or even get corporate involved. It is a shame, really. In many cases, the dealers do not want to honor the coverage because the rated reimbursement from GM is unrealistic and isn't adequate enough to cover the actual time it takes to repair the vehicle. Dealers are faced with either losing money on the job to do it right, or working too quickly and doing a subpar job.

Dealers are not as friendly and forthcoming as people want to believe. They are the profit center of any dealership and work as hard as possible to maximize the revenue of every single service appointment booked on every single day. $80 cabin filters, $80 windshield wipers, $100 fuel system cleaners (which is simply a bottle of GM branded Techron), unnecessary tire balancing, needless wheel alignments, etc. If the service departments did only the actual recommended services as listed in the vehicle owners manual, they would go out of business. That is why there are endless upsells. One dealer wanted to charge me over $600 for their 20,000 mile dealer service on my Equinox a few years ago. I said no, and did only what the owner's manual said needed to be done. It was $100 and I was done back home in less than 2 hours. The dealer called me incessantly for 2 weeks after to schedule an appointment to do the "refused services". I finally had to get the service manager involved to stop the calls and text messages.
 

·
Registered
2019 GMC Terrain 2.0 AWD , no V92 trailer option
Joined
·
517 Posts
The DI is not the problem . The problem is short trips with the engine not fully warming up. An engine with some wear and using a grade of cheap engine oil that is too thin and is not a low ash formulation is trouble. The crankcase ventilation system is drawing that water and oil vapor into the cold intake manifold and onto the back of the cold valves and the vapors condense.
Some owners install a catch can in the PCV line to strain off most of the vapor and liquid.
The money you saved by using bargain brand oil has bit you in the backside.
 

·
Registered
2019 GMC Terrain 2.0 AWD , no V92 trailer option
Joined
·
517 Posts
iirc the 2.4L needs some drilling and tapping plus routing another line. The V6 and V8's are usually straight forward.
if this 2.4 had been using the proper oil, been on regular 70mph freeway trips and had been operated foot on the floor from 0-70MPH once and a while to clear the soot out . The problems would be minimal to none .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
That's interesting; but how is air directed through the crankcase?
Air enters via the hose between the side of the inlet plenum and the stock fitting on the valve cover ( circled in red in photo 2 )
17700


It then passes through the valve cover and down to the crankcase via the passage circled in blue.
17701


Blowby returns to the valve cover via the passage circled in yellow. It then passes through the air/oil separator built into the top of the valve cover and exits through a PCV valve that I added on top of the valve cover.
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top