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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Something happened to me that makes me think that I may never purchase another GM product.

I own a 2012 GMC Terrain with a 2.4L Ecotec engine. While driving, the warnings "oil pressure low stop engine" and engine power low stop engine suddenly appeared. I turned the vehicle off immediately and had it towed to a mechanic who found that the PCV orifice was clogged and built up pressure in the engine blowing out the rear main seal and drained the engine of all its oil.

After doing some research I found GM Service Bulletin No.14882, Dated: March 2015.

See this link: https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2015/SB-10090101-2280.pdf

This service bulletin includes 2010-2013 GMC Terrains with 2.4L Ecotec engines and describes exactly what happened to me.

I called GMC Customer Service at 1-800-462-8782 and spoke with Diane who told me that my vehicle wasn't covered by this bulletin based on my VIN. I asked to speak with her supervisor and she put Annie on the phone who told me to have the vehicle towed to a GM Dealership for evaluation but they were not going to cover any of the repairs. Why would I have my vehicle towed all over town if it's not going to be covered?

Bottom line: This repair should be covered because:
A. It is one of the models described in GM Service Bulletin 14882
and
B. The service bulletin described exactly what happened to me.

Has this lack of customer service happened to anyone else?
 

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Are you over the stated mileage or just your car Vin number is not listed? If its just the Vin you might be able to get a local rep to approve it. Sounds like they picked a group they said was having the issues and not all of them.

This is just like the Takata air bag problem. The problem is thought to only occur on a certain build time but in reality it might be all of them.
 

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#14882: Special Coverage Adjustment - Plugged PCV Orifice in Intake Manifold - (Mar 4, 2015)
Subject: 14882 – Special Coverage Adjustment – Plugged PCV Orifice in Intake Manifold

Models: 2010-2013 Buick LaCrosse
2011-2013 Buick Regal
2012-2013 Buick Verano
2011-2013 Chevrolet Captiva
2010-2014 Chevrolet Equinox
2013 Chevrolet Malibu
2012-2013 Chevrolet Orlando
2010-2013 GMC Terrain
Equipped with 2.4L Ecotec Engine (LAF, LEA or LUK)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Condition
Certain 2010-2013 Buick LaCrosse; 2011-2013 Buick Regal; 2012-2013 Buick Verano; 2011-2013 Chevrolet Captiva; 2010-2014 Chevrolet Equinox; 2013 Chevrolet Mailbu; 2012-2013 Chevrolet Orlando; 2010-2013 GMC Terrain vehicles equipped with a 2.4L engine (LAF, LEA or LUK) that have experienced high oil consumption may also experience a frozen and/or plugged PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) system during cold weather operation. This condition may increase crankcase pressure leading to a rear crankshaft seal oil leak. If the oil leak is ignored or not noticed, an engine clatter noise may be noticeable and/or the engine pressure warning light may illuminate. If this condition is not corrected, continued driving with engine noise and/or the engine oil pressure light illuminated may damage the engine.

Special Coverage Adjustment
This special coverage covers the condition described above for a period of 10 years or 120,000 miles (193,000 km), whichever occurs first, from the date the vehicle was originally placed in service, regardless of ownership.

Dealers are to perform a crankcase pressure check, and if required, remove the intake manifold and clear the PCV orifice. The repairs will be made at no charge to the customer.

For vehicles covered by Vehicle Service Contracts, all eligible claims with repair orders on or after March 4, 2015, are covered by this special coverage and must be submitted using the labor operation codes provided with this bulletin. Claims with repair orders prior to March 4, 2015, must be submitted to the Service Contract provider.

Vehicles Involved
All involved vehicles are identified by Vehicle Identification Number on the Applicable Warranties section in GM Global Warranty Management system. Dealership service personnel should always check this site to confirm vehicle involvement prior to beginning any required inspections and/or repairs. It is important to routinely use this tool to verify eligibility because not all similar vehicles may be involved regardless of description or option content.

Parts Information
Parts required to complete this special coverage are to be obtained from General Motors Customer Care and Aftersales (GMCCA).

Note: Use the vehicle identification number (VIN), SI and the GM Electronic Parts Catalog to determine which parts to order. The Crankshaft Rear Oil Seal Replacement procedure in SI states what parts are required to complete the repair. For example, gaskets, one-time use fasteners, and fluids.
 

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Seems like there must be 2 people who have their vehicles ON the list, and all the rest must not be on it. i.e. You are not alone. You can fight it, but I am not sure that anyone has been successful - but the is always the first time. Good luck, and report back !
 

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It says only 11,624 vehicles affected. And the way it's worded, it sounds like they were trying to limit their exposure to only those units that *also* experienced oil consumption.

I don't see how the two things are (necessarily) connected. The oil consumption problem was bad piston rings. THIS problem is a clogged PCV - most-likely related to cold temperatures. You certainly could have a 'good' engine (NOT consuming oil) that could also develop a clogged PCV (if you lived in a snow belt state, for example). What they *should* have done was send this letter to ALL 2.4L engine owners - (prioritizing the cold-climate owners), telling them to bring their vehicle in for a quick PCV modification to lessen the likelihood of sudden oil loss and catastrophic engine damage. And THEN they could've also educated owners on what to look out for - to further protect the vehicle (and the customer's pocket book).

But, for whatever reason ... they didn't do either.

But they DID put this line in the letter (which I find amusing):

Do not take your vehicle to your GM dealer as a result of this letter unless you believe that your vehicle has the condition as described above.

So they give a warning and take it back in the same letter, leaving it up to an unsuspecting customer to determine whether *they* think anything needs to be done or not.

Unbelievable!
 

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I just posted the same about my 2012 Equinox. They haven't updated the service bulletin 14882 since it was posted in 2015. I had the same response from GM, no help at all. I want to do something because this is happening to so many people and GM will not take responsibility. I'm not letting this go. I asked if anyone was successful fighting GM on this issue?
 

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We had the exact same issue this morning. 10 degs, Low Oil Stop Engine Message, blew main seal, our VIN not included in TSB. Called GM, they said we don't cover it. Called GM dealer, they said we can't cover it, and GM won't do anything about it.
 

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Nice... Not happy GM is not taking care of people with this issue. it's clearly GM's fault and they are intentionally leaving owners out in the cold on it. I guess they have no shame or are just greedy, or both.
 

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12gmcterrain,
Terribly sorry to hear of your "frustration"
Yes, rear main seal failure is common for this 2.4 liter engine in winter conditions.

You are correct, a horrible design from GM.
AND GM stopped making this engine.

If only you came to this forum last month, your "frustration" would have been prevented, clever "addidas" found the solution last year.

Kindly 12gmcTerrain,
Could you tell us your details,
the Temperature, your speed , rpms, how long you were driving?


Crankshaft rear main seal failure can be easily prevented,
By purchasing the $80 c-f-m oil cap
And swapping out the OEM oil cap for the $80 cfm oil cap.

On this forum, last year, the brilliant "jaytee" identified the failure mode of crankshaft rear main seal failure in cold weather....
https://www.terrainforum.net/10-general-tech-section/19745-interesting-find-crankcase-vent.html
JayTee explained ^^^^^.....

I explain..... ==>
When the dirty side internal PCV orifice which is just an 80 thousands of an inch diameter hole on the plastic molded nylon intake manifold
When the hole in the plastic is gunked up plugged with cold engine oil and crankcase gasses sludge, and even frozen water vapor crystals(ice)
( which is very common, even normal, yes, very normal in cold weather)
And
When the clean side PCV breather orifice hose freezes ( which happens when it is very cold out side)
And then
Piston blowby (from worn piston rings, also normal, and especially from ecotec engines manufactured before may 2013)
Then Piston blowby during wide open throttle (WOT) creates high crankcase pressure .....
Then,
The Result of high crankcase pressure because pressure can not vent thru plugged dirty side PCV orifice
Nor can crankcase pressure vent thru frozen cleanside PCV breather hose
THEN
Then crankshaft rear main seal failure occurs
The crankcase pressure blows a hole through the viton (plastic) crankshaft rear main seal.
along with its disastrous after effects as when oil is pumped out of car onto the road thru this hole in the seal.

Last year, JayTee came up with a creative home made oil cap to address the problem!
Then
about Christmas 2018, the clever "addidas" discovered the commercially available $80, cfm oil cap ,
and tested it on his equinox. Checking fuel trims, and in ice cold minus 10 degree weather, It worked perfectly!

Now, I run the cfm oil cap on my cars.

The cfm oil cap, with the one way vented, with nylon ball seal, prevents rear main seal failure, it gives a 3rd path for crankcase pressure to escape from your engine even when the PCV system fails.
And bonus
It keeps crankcase pressure very low which is great to help your piston rings seal better
and helps the oil control ring "squeegee" oil of cylinder walls
And keeps crankcase gunk out of your cleanside PCV breather hose.

12gmcterrain, you were clever enough to stop driving.
Some folks don't, and then the engines become junk.
 

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Did you ever make any headway on this? I am in the same boat. Happened Dec. 2019- My car has sat for 3.5 months.
 

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12gmcterrain,
Terribly sorry to hear of your "frustration"
Yes, rear main seal failure is common for this 2.4 liter engine in winter conditions.

You are correct, a horrible design from GM.
AND GM stopped making this engine.

If only you came to this forum last month, your "frustration" would have been prevented, clever "addidas" found the solution last year.

Kindly 12gmcTerrain,
Could you tell us your details,
the Temperature, your speed , rpms, how long you were driving?


Crankshaft rear main seal failure can be easily prevented,
By purchasing the $80 c-f-m oil cap
And swapping out the OEM oil cap for the $80 cfm oil cap.

On this forum, last year, the brilliant "jaytee" identified the failure mode of crankshaft rear main seal failure in cold weather....
https://www.terrainforum.net/10-general-tech-section/19745-interesting-find-crankcase-vent.html
JayTee explained ^^^^^.....

I explain..... ==>
When the dirty side internal PCV orifice which is just an 80 thousands of an inch diameter hole on the plastic molded nylon intake manifold
When the hole in the plastic is gunked up plugged with cold engine oil and crankcase gasses sludge, and even frozen water vapor crystals(ice)
( which is very common, even normal, yes, very normal in cold weather)
And
When the clean side PCV breather orifice hose freezes ( which happens when it is very cold out side)
And then
Piston blowby (from worn piston rings, also normal, and especially from ecotec engines manufactured before may 2013)
Then Piston blowby during wide open throttle (WOT) creates high crankcase pressure .....
Then,
The Result of high crankcase pressure because pressure can not vent thru plugged dirty side PCV orifice
Nor can crankcase pressure vent thru frozen cleanside PCV breather hose
THEN
Then crankshaft rear main seal failure occurs
The crankcase pressure blows a hole through the viton (plastic) crankshaft rear main seal.
along with its disastrous after effects as when oil is pumped out of car onto the road thru this hole in the seal.

Last year, JayTee came up with a creative home made oil cap to address the problem!
Then
about Christmas 2018, the clever "addidas" discovered the commercially available $80, cfm oil cap ,
and tested it on his equinox. Checking fuel trims, and in ice cold minus 10 degree weather, It worked perfectly!

Now, I run the cfm oil cap on my cars.

The cfm oil cap, with the one way vented, with nylon ball seal, prevents rear main seal failure, it gives a 3rd path for crankcase pressure to escape from your engine even when the PCV system fails.
And bonus
It keeps crankcase pressure very low which is great to help your piston rings seal better
and helps the oil control ring "squeegee" oil of cylinder walls
And keeps crankcase gunk out of your cleanside PCV breather hose.

12gmcterrain, you were clever enough to stop driving.
Some folks don't, and then the engines become junk.
Is this the one you're talking about?

https://www.amazon.com/CFM-Performance-compatible-2010-2017-Chevrolet/dp/B07Q76RL8K
 
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