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Hello All, I just had to replace the battery on my 2016 Terrain Denali. The previous owner replaced it less than 3 years ago. Is 2-3 years the average battery life?

Also, I have a short 10 minute commute and run the radio while on my lunch break in my car. Could this be the cause of the battery draining? Short commute, not giving the alternator enough time to charge then me running the radio for 40ish minutes a day?

Thanks for your help!
 

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Definitely. Short trips did not give the battery enough charge cycles to recover and your daily drain did not help as well. The batteries in my vehicles last at least 5-years. My ACDelco batteries all carry a 60 months warranty. My 2009 Torrent lasted 7 years. It was frozen solid because of the frigid weather.
 

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Yea lol the repair manual I have says to remove and charge the battery every time you change the oil.. Equinox's take a ridiculous amount of battery power idk why. Maybe it has something to do with the several duty cycles the alternator goes through... on the newer suburban those guys are running on tow/haul mode just to keep the battery charged... I think they are trying to trick the fuel economy by using 5 different duty cycles on the alternator... either way I have heard on any car the alternator isn't supposed to actually charge a battery but "maintain" the battery kinda bs but yea it doesn't hurt to charge it every now and again. 2-3 years is plenty for average battery life especially playing the radio with the motor off and a modern COP (coil on plug) ignition...they draw so much power its amazing. Even if your battery only lasted 2 years I wouldn't think anything of it.
 

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then me running the radio for 40ish minutes a day?
o_O OH shytskees yea 40 minutes is like off the hook! seriously these cars have really good powerful amplifiers in them for the stereo that would be like idk dropping a wrench across the terminals and letting it sit for a couple minutes lol, u wanna run the radio for like 10 min yea okay but, 40 min! average car battery 50amp hour okay... radio takes probably around lets say50- 100 watts for 40 minutes that would be like draining
12/50-12/100 ////////////4ah to 8ah out of a 50ah battery every lunch break....okay you either have a good battery ////(CHEMISTRY) or just very lucky the alternator is like 130amp so but that's at like full draw...it doesn't really do more like 10-90 amp at most.. i'm impressed its even keeping up for 2 months.
 

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It takes a minimum of 15 min. of engine running time to recharge the battery after only one engine start.
Add it up over time with short commutes and battery life is reduced as it's never getting fully charged.
Add in the radio on time and it makes it worse.
Battery quality is a big factor also. There is a big difference between brands and price. Cheaper less warranty battery is a lesser quality battery hence shorter warranty on it.
 
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The original battery on my 2015 Equinox lasted 4.5 years. I replaced it with an Autocraft from Advance Auto Parts which has been doing great for the past 1.5 years, despite the vehicle having been sitting 5-6 days a week for the past 10 months during the pandemic. When I do drive it, I try to get it out on the highway as opposed to around town jaunts since it takes about 30min of continuous driving to charge the battery. When growing up, I was always taught to never run electrical accessories in the car for more than a few minutes without the car running.

Running the radio on accessory power for 40 minutes at a time is a pretty substantial drain on the battery. I have co-workers that like to listen to their radios at lunch, but they will sit in their cars with the engine idling for 45-50 minutes each day at lunch. Not sure that excessive idling helps the car either.
 

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Idling just reduces oil life. Look at emergency / police vehicle idle time. I've put on a lot of idle time on my old job's vans also over the years zero issues keeping a warm / cool cab. Fuel injected run so lean at idle it's not a issue anymore like the carb. days.
Autocraft (Advance) battery in Silver version lasted 3 yrs in my standby generator. And it's on a float charger and a temp. regulated battery warmer in winter.
OEM battery in my 'nox only lasted 3 yrs. Wife drove it daily with a 12 mile each way commute. OEM in my Tahoe came out at 7 due to age, not that it was bad.
Odyssey batteries in the Tahoe and generator now.
 

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We usually get 5-7 years on the batteries in our cars. We live in the Central US so we deal with over 100F in the summer and below 0F in the Winter. We just replaced the original battery in our 2015 Terrain last year due to a crack in the case near the post. It was holding charge just fine, just corroding the battery clamps really bad. My previous car was a TL and in the 12 years I owned it, the battery was replaced once....and it also was not due to charging issues but was a cracked case corroding the clamps.

This past year with the lack of normal commuting and such, we have put two battery maintainers in our garage. My car (Volvo) gets driven less than 10 miles a day if at all, has start/stop and gobs of electronics, so I connect the charger up weekly. My wife's vehicle (Terrain) gets driven more often and longer, as well as her tolerance for the charge cables is lower, gets connected up usually once a month or so.
 

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So with the pandemic most of the mileage in this last year on my wife's 17 Nox has been short trips, the original AC-Delco battery will be 4 yrs. old next month. I've been monitoring the battery voltage with my multi-meter pretty closely given the age of the battery and the fact that I'm a bit paranoid about all the electrical gremlins that can show up in these modern vehicles nowadays if they're not getting enough voltage. Last few weeks of mostly short trips has resulted in resting battery voltage of anywhere between 12.2 and 12.4V. Yesterday my wife drove her daughter back to college and with the return trip her road miles were approximately 350 mi. Today I used my multi-meter to check the battery voltage and got a result of 12.62 V which equates to about a 95% charge. I realize load testing is the best way to check a battery's condition, but I feel fairly confident since this battery still will take almost a full charge that it isn't to badly sulfonated yet. When it comes time to replace this battery I may go to a H6 or group 48 battery to replace the H5/group 47 battery that came in the 2.4L as I believe the larger battery will fit the tray. Anyhow I guess the gist of the story is that if you're not getting a long drive in once in awhile, a battery maintainer or smart charger may be in order, especially if your vehicle has start/stop and most certainly an AGM battery.
 

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Good advice.
 

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just a tidbit of advice the agm/agm technology batteries are the best and its the extreme heat/cold tempurature changes that ruin batteries along with voltage fluctuations like running dead. I have no problems running a 1 year battery when used properly for 5+ years all you have to do is insulate it even just a little and keep it charged around 12.6v and full of distilled water I have an optima battery that's about 10 years old...granted I live in California along the coast but yea when you leave it un insulated and running it chronically discharged after leaving it cold overnight and then heating it from radiant heat of the motor it just ruins it. Its the temperature fluctuations that really mess up the battery. Ive seen people with bmw's and stuff with batteries stored inside the car with the original factory battery in the trunk well over 10 years old still running. Some diehard people drive me nuts when they put a old A55 battery on the charger and keep on running it even after sitting dead for weeks. Ive had people ask me to replace just the battery on cars that are 20+ years old and i say okay as long as we do the alternator too... their awnser is always HUH>? WHY? Because the alternator is the reason your blowing through batteries the brushes are spring loaded and when you get down to the spring or close to it or have a worn alternator your going to burn through a battery every couple of years and its not going to charge as efficiently... they only last about 5-7 years or 50-100k miles depending on draw like headlights, radio ect. Yea an alternator can test good but they make a ridiculous amount of power when new and degrade over time. A alternator that puts out 200+ amps at high rpm wont do that when its over 50k miles the brushes... Electric motor technology... back in the olden days rc car motors were called lathe motors because you could literally take them apart, take the spindle and resurface the part of the motor the brushes make contact with on a lathe along with replacing the brushes to add more power... Its only a matter of time befor alternators become brushless and last forever as well. We are using the same technology as the 50s when it comes to alternators.
 

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Well the battery in my wife's 17 Nox was good until it wasn't (see post #9), no warning like slow cranking or dim headlights or such. Saturday the battery died on her in a local grocery store parking lot. Of course being a woman she had to park as close as possible to the front of the store so we had to wait for awhile for a parking spot to open up so I could position my K1500 close enough for my jumper cables to reach. I had tried my old jumper box but even fully charged the battery was so old it didn't cut the mustard. Got the old battery out Saturday afternoon and picked up a new AC-Delco Gold 42 mo. battery at a local Chev. dealer this morning. The factory battery was only 525 CCA, the new Delco group 47 has 650 CCA. I've always had good luck with Delco batteries and the price was right too. List was $136, I asked for an old geezer discount so the net was $117. The big box auto parts stores here wanted a lot more for their premium batteries, e.g. Advance Auto wanted $170 for their Diehard Gold and it was only a 36 mo. battery. I'm not even sure that the Diehard brand is all it was when Sears gained the rep with it, the equivalent Diehard weighs in at 33 lbs. compared to the Delco's 35 lbs. I had originally planned on going to the larger group 48 battery as I believe the battery box is large enough, but my positive cable was so short with no slack to move it aside, I had enough trouble getting the old group 47 battery out without fighting that cable to get a larger battery installed. I told this long winded story because I need a couple of recommendations, first on an inexpensive TPMS relearn tool, not sure if it was the low voltage or the jump start but the DIC shows dashes now for all 4 tire positions, not getting a warning tho. Secondly need opinions on these new compact lithium battery jump starters, unsure whether to try one of those or get a new battery for my Jump N' Carry, TIA.
 

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yeah, our 2013 is nearing 98,000 and its on its 3rd battery.
1- factory unit
2- AC DELCO replacement
3-Interstate/Costco unit currently in the vehicle.

the 2 failures gave no warning. All starts were normal. Until it just CLICK CLICK CLICK.

on our Traverse with tow- Normaly the computer controls alternator output. a fuel saving measure.
UNLESS you turn on tow function. In which case the alternator is always charging. this is done to charge the battery in your towed device (if it has its own battery).
 

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The battery in tpms should last 5-7 years depending on how often you drive your vehicle. May be the jump caused the reset. I would try to relearn it first before investing into new tpms.

I thought about getting a compact lithium battery jump starters but dropped the idea. Most of the time the jump starter will be sitting in a glove box waiting for actions. The battery eventually will be killed by the hot or cold weather. If not, the battery will die from aging anyway. I have CAA (AAA), of course the wait time is another discussion topic.

The review on the jump starters I read usually good during the first three years. Some only last for a year. Buy with fingers crossed and don't forget to recharge on a regular basis.
 

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Dave, I was asking for recommendations on a TPMS relearn tool, not the actual TPMS sensors, thanks for your thoughts on the jump starters. rbarrios, I used to be proactive on battery replacement, this time I was reactive, I'm blaming my old bones and the desire to reach 4 full years on the original battery, but after looking at the amp specs on the original battery tag, I surmise it was a new car only battery meant to last only past the 36 mo. bumper to bumper warranty. In any case with the electrical load newer vehicles have, I guess it pays to be proactive with battery replacement and not wait for those old warning signs, apparently even the decent voltage readings I was getting with my multimeter weren't reliable first warning signs.
 

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I've got a cheapo Amazon TPMS tool. It's been working fine for at least 4-5 yrs now on my ''fleet'' when doing rotations.
I spent the money on the best battery for my Tahoe, Generac and Harley and that's a Odyssey AGM battery. Not much more expensive than box store junk which usually is Johnson Controls made.
Deka made batteries are my 2nd choice.
 
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Dave, I was asking for recommendations on a TPMS relearn tool, not the actual TPMS sensors, thanks for your thoughts on the jump starters. rbarrios, I used to be proactive on battery replacement, this time I was reactive, I'm blaming my old bones and the desire to reach 4 full years on the original battery, but after looking at the amp specs on the original battery tag, I surmise it was a new car only battery meant to last only past the 36 mo. bumper to bumper warranty. In any case with the electrical load newer vehicles have, I guess it pays to be proactive with battery replacement and not wait for those old warning signs, apparently even the decent voltage readings I was getting with my multimeter weren't reliable first warning signs.
Agree with all that. I have a cheap load tester plus with COVID and shorter trips my wife makes anyway to work, I put all 3 vehicles we have on battery maintainers . . . especially now in winter. Even if sitting just over a weekend without driving.
My truck and Sonic batteries are going on 4 years old and the Acadia is just 18 months old.
But thinking about replacing the truck battery and Sonic battery. I like to buy sometime in late winter. I feel that the stock is likely fresher since many people have batteries die over winter and stock gets replaced in parts departments and stores.
 
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JayTee, when I picked up the new AC-Delco battery yesterday I told the dealer parts counterman that I wanted to check the date code before I brought my core in. He brought the new battery out from back and when I asked him about the date code he said May of 2020 but was a bit befuddled because it had the new Delco labeling on it and mentioned that most of their batteries still had the old labeling. Turns out the guy didn't have a clue as he was pulling numbers from the AC-Delco part #, not reading Delco's alpha-numeric code which showed 2 of 21, so their date code is not date of manufacture but estimated date of placed in service. Just to be sure I had brought my multi-meter with me and tested the voltage right in their parking lot. Voltage was 12.71, about as fresh as it gets.
 
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