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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In conjunction with the Oil Catch Can thread, this is for those of you that are interested.

On the I4 2.4 DI, GM does not use a PCV valve per say, they are using a EVAP Emmissions Purge Valve (#508) which is mounted directly onto the valve cover via part # 528 and then is tubed over (part #532) to the intake side.

For us V6 owners - GM has used actual PCV valves (two of them, part #'s 210 and 242) #242 tubed over via part# 628 and #210 tubed over by # 610 over to the intake side.

Always leave the OEM PCV valves/EVAP purge valve installed when installing an oil catch can, just install catch can anywhere downstream of the OEM valves and away from any direct source of high heat.

Many thanks to my Hubby for providing me with this info. :-*[/color]
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
A few interested. [/color]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
For those interested, the routing for the PCV lines on the 3.0L is the same on the 3.6L
 

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Question: There are two PCV valves on the V6 so do you need 2 catch cans or is there one location where you can cut a connecting hose and install one can?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Default User said:
Wait - so on the I4 - if you have a K&N air intake system - you lose the EVAP?
No, I believe those that have installed the K&N made mention that the K&N intake tube has the connection for the EVAP, as you don't remove the EVAP canister, you just install the catch can downstream of the EVAP.

swannerd said:
Question: There are two PCV valves on the V6 so do you need 2 catch cans or is there one location where you can cut a connecting hose and install one can?
Great question: My Hubby is pondering over just how he is going to pull this off. As my 'catch can' is to be here by tuesday.
One option; the PCV line that runs to the air intake (just prior to the throttle body) will be utilized for sure, the second one which runs to the intake plenum itself (just downstream of the throttle body) may be omitted and plugged off.
Second option; run both lines from each PCV to the catch can (as only one can needs to be used). Would just need to find one of those fancy 2 to 1 inserts for the 3/8ths fuel line that we are using.
Will have to source that out on Monday.
 

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Polrcub II-
I just sent the following email to Tracy @ Revextrem:

"Per the information I received on the Equinox forum, there are two PCV valves on the 2013 3.6 V6 engine . Is there a location that will allow me to only use the one catch can or is there a catch can with two inlets and one outlet?"

Hopefully the answer will be that the catch can has two inlets- one for each PCV valve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
swannerd said:
Polrcub II-
I just sent the following email to Tracy @ Revextrem:

"Per the information I received on the Equinox forum, there are two PCV valves on the 2013 3.6 V6 engine . Is there a location that will allow me to only use the one catch can or is there a catch can with two inlets and one outlet?"

Hopefully the answer will be that the catch can has two inlets- one for each PCV valve.
Excellent!! :thumb:
Hopefully you'll hear back tomorrow/Tuesday
 

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Re: Re: PCV valve locations

He might say different, but I have used them and seen them used on V engines by using a "y" connector. A "t" fitting will work but one vapor stream will be making a 90 degree turn. The likely hood of it being a problem on a stock engine is small but some of you guys are perfectionists. Wanted to bring that to your attention.

Sent from my communication device.
 

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Polrcub II,
I received the following instruction from the Catch Can vendor that must reference the same drawing your husband provided to us:

Hi Dave,

It installs between figure 242 and the intake manifold top. The other side is the clean side and does not need to be addressed. We also pull part 242 out with a vice grips and drill the top hole and both bottom holes to 7/64" inches and re install.


RX Performance Products
1614 20th St E
Palmetto, FL 34221
941-721-1826
941-721-1896 fax

NOTE:
Drilling the existing holes in 242 PCV valve oversize must be their answer to the engine having two PCV valves and going oversize on 242 would allow more of the crankcase vapor to be pulled out from that side. I'm thinking I would follow your lead and install a "Y" connector into the catch can and hook both PCV lines up without doing any drilling as I'm having 2nd thoughts about cutting lines, etc and doing something that GM could void my engine warranty for. I only have 5800 miles on the engine-maybe I'll ask the dealership for their input ? I'm sure if asking GM, the answer would be YES it would void warranty. It would be nice if GM offered a "approved" catch can for these engines that obviously need it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Excellent! Thanks for the info.
So the catch can is installed only on the one PCV line (part #628 from #242)

Part #610 is the clean side and is not required.

Did I hear you right?
 

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Yep, that's what they said- I personally think your "Y" connector that would enable both PCV valves to be hooked up to the catch can (without drilling the holes in the one valve) would give better results. Why would one side PCV be a "Clean Side" and the other not? I'm thinking that by drilling out the holes in the one PCV, they are allowing most of the blow-by vapors to be sucked out of the crankcase thru that modified PCV and the other side may or may not get some of the oil vapor. I don't want any oil vapors going back into the engine. The valve stems already get enough lubrication from the oil getting by the valve guide seals. Plus it would be easier for me to remove the catch can and modified hoses if the vehicle has to go back to the dealer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I concur,, that would be a better more user friendly set-up.
Interesting that one side is referred to as the clean side, but I suppose that does make some sense as that line (610) attaches upstream of the TB. So it would get less gunk build up and the 'dirty' side (628) attaches to the IM.

Just picked up my filter, just have to find some Y or T connectors.
 

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Please take pictures of install and add instructions - if you don't mind. Your install will probably be the yardstick that all others will use to perform their catch can install.
good Job!
 

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I tried a Husky water/oil separator on my 2010 I4. Drove it 1000 km. The inside of the glass bowl was not even oily so I took the mess off and that was it. So much for good intentions.

What I have noticed though was that the intake area is caked with black stuff. I decided to look at the plugs. Black colored. That before I got the ECM reprogrammed because of pinging. Once temperature is reasonable again will take a look at the plugs again.
 

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Re: Re: PCV valve locations

The clean side he is referring to is the place where the air enters the crankcase. You have to have air in to create flow in the crankcase when vacuum is applied.
So you only hook up to the pcv side like he said.

Sent from my communication device.
 

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OK! That makes sense to me now- to suck air out of the crankcase, air must be pulled in to the crankcase.
 

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I received the following response to a email in reference to installing a "Y" to connect both PCV valves to a single catch can:


Here is how the crankcase evacuation system (PCV) works on this (and all gasoline engines today, but I'll describe your engine specifically)

Filtered fresh air enters the valve cover on the side through 610 & 210 in the diagram. This is the clean side. It is the filtered fresh air metered by the MAF sensor (for proper A/F ratio so the ECU can command the proper cylinder fill rates and injector duty/pulses, etc.) into one valve cover where it is drawn past the valve train assembly, into the main crankcase, where it flushes the damaging combustion byproducts through and out the opposite heads valve train and out the dirty side (contaminated side) through 242. This is then (through the intake manifold vacuum) mixed with the intake air charge and burned in the combustion chamber and further in the catalytic converter. The problem we are correcting/curing is separating the oil vapors from these combustion byproducts so the oil is not causing the coking and detonation that degrades the power and economy and engine life.

The oil separating system installs inline on the final path of the dirty side before it enters the intake manifold.

If you Y or T these two sides together, you have now defeated proper evacuation and the system is mixed never removing these damaging compounds.

These consist of among other things:

Un burnt fuel
Water vapor
abrasive carbon particles
and sulfuric acid

If these are NOT evacuated while still in a suspended state, as soon as you shut the motor down and it cools these condense and mix with the engine oil. Every time you go through a heat and cooling cycle the concentration accumulates until the sulfuric acid content reaches a certain PPM and begins to etch the bearing surfaces and the crank journals. The smaller carbon particles are to small for the micron size of the oil filter to trap so they start to increase wear on all internal parts.

So, to those putting a Y in and combining these lines together may be stopping the oil ingestion, but causing the engine to wear much faster and cause more extensive damage.

The internet is full of well intended, but uneducated people trying what they "think" is correct....same with most shops.....they don't understand proper crankcase evacuation as it is one of the most misunderstood systems on the modern gasoline engine.
 

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I have seen the result when the 2 PCV's were joined together, this was on a V8, the oil pan looked like it was breathing (flexing) in and out when the engine was idling. There wasn't a way for fresh air to get in. If left that way I think it would have probably sucked a seal in somewhere to get fresh air. These systems are somewhat complex (these days) and need to be researched before any alterations are made over stock.

Swannerd good job checking this out.
 
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