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Discussion Starter #1
Info for others with this problem.
My 2013 Equinox 2.4L threw a P0010 code yesterday (MIL light on steady) and stalled in my driveway. Vehicle only has 46,249 miles on the odo. Started it up and it ran fine but the MIL light was still on. Oil is clean. The read out on my software scanner showed "intake camshaft actuator solenoid circuit open bank 1". I tested the solenoid (hot and cold) with an ohm meter which showed 12.76 ohms. According to the service manual that is in range. Exhaust solenoid reading compared the same so the solenoid coil was ok. I tested the wiring back to the ECM and it too was good but the code remained. Since there was nothing else to test in this particular circuit I decided to test the solenoid on the bench with a 12V source. The solenoid operated just fine but then I remembered this is a PWM (pulse width modulated) circuit which means the 12V pulse can be different durations depending on the ECM commands. I decided that maybe the solenoid mechanical internals could be worn and causing this problem. I replaced the solenoid with a AC Delco unit and then cleared the code only to see it come back as permanent code. I performed the required drive cycles to clear the permanent code and all is well now. I verified this with a camshaft variation test in my software. So the moral of this story is that even though all the electrical tests on the solenoid passed there is the mechanical internals to consider too.
Hope this helps others in troubleshooting this code.
 

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Yeah ... there is no "direct feedback" from these devices that would allow the ECM to verify that the device did, in fact, mechanically open to the commanded position.

I wonder if there are multiple codes the ECM could throw in this situation, or if it just uses this one as a "catch-all" when it commands the solenoid to a certain position, but then the Timing feedback indicates it's somewhere else?

I would imagine if there was a real Open Circuit, the Solenoid would "fail open" ... to allow maximum oil flow. And maybe that's where the ECM thought the Solenoid was (toward full open) based on Timing input? I don't have my manuals handy right now ... does more oil flow Advance the Timing?
 
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Colt, Like you said a catch all. The ECM is blind to actual position of the internal cam solenoid mechanism (no direct feedback loop) but does a variation comparison to what is commanded (ECM output to solenoid) and what the cam sensor is reporting as well as the crankshaft sensor. I think. The intake cam position was at 16 percent and not changing and did not vary with RPM but the ECM was commanding it to between 57-60 percent. When I fixed the problem there was no variation reported. A problem I have with this definition is that the DTC P0010-00 code was " intake camshaft actuator solenoid circuit open bank 1" which to me as an electronics tech means the electrical circuit part was faulty as you sorta indicated above.
As far as oil flow I don't know for sure what 16 cam percent will give me for oil flow to the cam phasor but the car ran fine on a short drive with the code active.
 

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The intake cam position was at 16 percent and not changing and did not vary with RPM but the ECM was commanding it to between 57-60 percent.
When I fixed the problem there was no variation reported.
[/QUOTE]

Are you saying there was no change here ... that it continued to work the same way?

As far as oil flow I don't know for sure what 16 cam percent will give me for oil flow to the cam phasor but the car ran fine on a short drive with the code active.
This would seem to indicate that the (original) solenoid was at the correct oil flow position (mechanically) to maintain the correct timing, no?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I wasn't clear in my response. Concerning no variation, I meant that the command from the ECM was able to vary the cam position % relative to crankshaft position. There probably was enough oil flow at 16% to allow normal engine timing operation.
 
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