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Discussion Starter #1
At the current time, I am working in northern Pennsylvania and winter is upon us. The tires that came on my vehicle when purchased are more of a summer to all-season performance type tire and are failing miserably in this weather in the upper NE. Through my research I am looking into the Sumitomo ice Edge as a tire to get me through the time I have to be up here for business which could be till March. The tire gets great results so I am only looking for someone to justify a reason why I shouldn't purchase this tire due to its winter performance. These tires will be switched back out to my regular tires once I get back to Oklahoma.

**On a side note (and not important to some people), this tire bears the 3PMSF symbol for winter driving.**

Just a couple of things that may weight heavily in the debate....


  • My Terrain is FWD.
  • I don't want to break the bank for the short time I'll need tires, seasonally.
  • I could leave these tires on the wheels and use them as my winter set once I get back home as I am planning on buying different, more aesthetically pleasing wheels different tires than are currently on my Terrain and once I return to Oklahoma.
  • They are studdable if i decided to go that route.

 

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I see nothing wrong with your choice, as any dedicated winter tire would be superior to an all season or performance tire.

Have you looked at tirerack.com for your research? They have many winter tire options and brands and also have done testing to establish the best choices.

They offer wheel/tire packages mounted, balanced, and shipped to your door or an authorized installer.

I've used their service many times, and haven't been disappointed yet.

Even if you don't purchase from them, they're a great place to research and compare tires and wheels.
 

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I'm just going to address the studdable issue. Although I live in SC now, I spent most of my years in eastern Wa. state that sees it's fair share of winter weather. If Pa. allows studded tires by all means go for that option, they are superior in all regards on icy roads, traction, steering, and probably most important braking as long as you have them on all 4 corners. They are noisy on dry roads and your mpg will suffer, but the piece of mind is well worth it. One caveat tho, you will have to remove them and go back to your summer tires before returning to Oklahoma as most certainly your journey home will take you through states that don't allow studded tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I see nothing wrong with your choice, as any dedicated winter tire would be superior to an all season or performance tire.

Have you looked at tirerack.com for your research? They have many winter tire options and brands and also have done testing to establish the best choices.

They offer wheel/tire packages mounted, balanced, and shipped to your door or an authorized installer.

I've used their service many times, and haven't been disappointed yet.

Even if you don't purchase from them, they're a great place to research and compare tires and wheels.
I did use TireRack as well as Discount Tire. This tire is very well revered as an option for winter with or without the studs. I originally brought my Silverado up here which has Duratracs on it, but they don't make them for this SUV with that particular wheel size so I thought this was a pretty good option for the price.

Thanks for your reply.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm just going to address the studdable issue. Although I live in SC now, I spent most of my years in eastern Wa. state that sees it's fair share of winter weather. If Pa. allows studded tires by all means go for that option, they are superior in all regards on icy roads, traction, steering, and probably most important braking as long as you have them on all 4 corners. They are noisy on dry roads and your mpg will suffer, but the piece of mind is well worth it. One caveat tho, you will have to remove them and go back to your summer tires before returning to Oklahoma as most certainly your journey home will take you through states that don't allow studded tires.
They clear the roads here pretty quickly, but if you get out when the snow is coming in.....well that's a whole different story. And from what I hear about the black ice up here, especially on the mountain roads that I have to drive to work, studs are a great idea...I'm just not into the added expense and trouble. However, you can never put a price on safety, right!?!?

Thanks for your response.
 

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They clear the roads here pretty quickly, but if you get out when the snow is coming in.....well that's a whole different story. And from what I hear about the black ice up here, especially on the mountain roads that I have to drive to work, studs are a great idea...I'm just not into the added expense and trouble. However, you can never put a price on safety, right!?!?

Thanks for your response.

I forgot to mention in my original post that if Oklahoma doesn't allow studded tires you would have to remove the studs before using those winter tires there, it can be done with sidecutters if there is enough of the nipple on the stud left or a small screwdriver to pry and needle nose pliers if not, but trust me, it's tedious and a PITA, so maybe something else for you to consider.
 

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I got bridgestone blizzak snow tires for my 19' terrain AWD and live in a lake effect snowbelt in N MI.. They have been outstanding and were "on sale" for $110 a piece. I feel as confident driving the terrain with these tires as I do my 4x4 silverado
 

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I grew up in New England and drove through a decade of winters. Granted, it was southern New England where snow can sometimes turn to rain, and I did live below the snow belt line ... so not terrible, but we got our share of major snowstorms, too. Never drove on anything but all-season radials. My father used snow tires when I was a kid, but once he started driving FWD vehicles, no more snow tires.

Are snow tires *really* necessary for anyone other than those who live way out in the boonies? You’ve got FWD, AWD, 4WD .... isn’t that good enough with all-season tires? I think I would buy a set of chains before I’d go through the aggravation of maintaining two sets of wheels. And then don’t you only need the snow tires for just a fraction of the time you have them on? So you’re swapping tires, then driving with noisy tires that are killing your MPGs most of the time. You gotta be driving on unplowed roads a lot to justify snow tires nowadays, I would think.

Even up in Canada. They must be right on top of snow plowing of roads it’s so commonplace, no? Everybody’s swapping tires all the time??
 

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I believe that the best vehicle and tire combo is the one that is behind the wheel. How you drive is the best determining factor. I can speak from experience as snow comes before Halloween and stays until just after Easter with the odd storm after. All my vehicles are AWD or 4x4 and have been for the last quarter century, through 3 Broncos, an Aerostar and Jeeps, now Suburban and Terrain. All of them have had snows. Is it a pain to swap them, yes I suppose if you were getting a garage to do it but not in my case. Is it more costly, yes up front however, you now have two sets of tires and wheels if you do it right and then you have doubled the life of your boots. I had a 2016 Dodge Journey AWD, and traded it for the Terrain, it also had snows, which are now being used by the Terrain, rims were changed to fit, however I did rent an identical Journey and it had just the normal solus tires that it came with, what a difference, it could not get out of its own way and slid and would spin. Its just my opinion and I respect anybody elses but snowtires are a great idea.
 

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Are snow tires *really* necessary for anyone other than those who live way out in the boonies? You’ve got FWD, AWD, 4WD .... isn’t that good enough with all-season tires? I think I would buy a set of chains before I’d go through the aggravation of maintaining two sets of wheels. And then don’t you only need the snow tires for just a fraction of the time you have them on? So you’re swapping tires, then driving with noisy tires that are killing your MPGs most of the time. You gotta be driving on unplowed roads a lot to justify snow tires nowadays, I would think.

Even up in Canada. They must be right on top of snow plowing of roads it’s so commonplace, no? Everybody’s swapping tires all the time??
I thought the same as you until the wife and I purchased a pair of Chevy Sonic's in 2012 as daily drivers. They were both LTZ trim and had the largest Hankook tire option with all season ratings.

They were just awful in snow; you couldn't stop, start or turn with those tires.

I purchased a set of OEM wheels from a Forum member, and got some winter tires from Tire Rack. It was a completely different vehicle in the snow with the winter tires.

I'm sure that some all season tires perform quite well in some applications, but from my experience with our vehicles with the OEM all seasons installed; it was a white knuckle experience every time it snowed.


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Our 19' Denali also came with the Hankook tires which are great in summer but perform poorly in the snow. For us living in Gaylord MI snow tires are a must. Often our roads are not plowed until the day after it snows 6" and if we have to get somewhere a 4x4 and/or good snow tires make that possible. There's no way I'd risk the terrain on our local roads with snow on them and it snows a LOT here. Sure it's a pain to change wheels 2x a year but with the second set of cheap wheels with the snow tires it's not like I have to take it in and pay someone to do it. It takes me about an hour to switch the wheels over. We don't go on long trips in winter so snow tires last many seasons but it IS a bummer that the tread life is poor. I'll accept the added expense and hassle to be sure my family is as safe as possible on snow covered roads. The difference in stopping ability and not getting stuck where cars with "all season" tires are mired in must be seen to be appreciated
 

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On my Tahoe and 'nox are Bridgestone Alenza all-season. Those Alenza's have great snow grip for a all season in my Tahoe and AWD 'nox and are at least a 60k mile tire. 20'' OEM rims on my Tahoe and have been on steep uphills on unplowed 8-10'' of snow and not gotten stuck. Snow covered road and the 3.6 'nox gets a great holeshot with those tires. They are OEM on my truck and they suprised me on my first winter, that's why they were my replacement choice for it and the 'nox.
On my FWD Malibu are studded snows on the front. Snows are a must on FWD, I always stud mine no matter what the ''law'' says. They come off in April anyway. There is nothing worse in the snow and ice than FWD so my choice is always a studded snow on them. I live on the NE PA border, they are the worst roads in winter, they don't plow until it stops snowing unlike NJ and NY.
 

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Snows are a must on FWD, I always stud mine no matter what the ''law'' says. They come off in April anyway. There is nothing worse in the snow and ice than FWD so my choice is always a studded snow on them. I live on the NE PA border, they are the worst roads in winter, they don't plow until it stops snowing unlike NJ and NY.
Really? FWD?? I remember as a kid, my Dad had a Plymouth Fury III with a HUGE trunk (could stack about 6 dead bodies in there ... at least!). It was a RWD vehicle. He couldn't make it up the street off the main drag to turn onto our street (and it was barely much of an incline). Used to get him SO MAD! He'd try packs of shingles in the trunk to weight it down ... and that would help, but not always. He'd end up having to park the car on the main drag (or the street off the main drag) and walk to the house! And then I remember a younger co-worker a few times coming by the house to pick him up and give him a lift to work. What did this co-worker drive (??) ... a 1960's VW Beetle! That made him even MORE mad! I remember him saying something like, "I've got this big V8 and he's got that little nothing car, and he goes right through the snow no problem"! The younger guy once told my Dad the secret was he never used the brake! LOL!

But like I said previously - once my Dad bought himself a FWD vehicle ... no more problems getting up that modestly inclined street to the house in the snowy winters.

I thought the engine directly over the drive wheels was the difference - in both the FWD vehicle AND the VW Beetle (which had the engine over the rear axle, IIRC)?

Also - if you're studding your tires, isn't that "muddying the waters" as to what's actually "working" for you? In other words ... if you could put studs on the All-Season tires, that would probably work, too.

Now - when it comes to ICE, that's another matter. I don't think it matters WHAT tires you have on your vehicle ... they're ALL gonna slide ... unless they're studded.

Do they make All-Season Tires that you can put studs on?
 

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.

Do they make All-Season Tires that you can put studs on?

I doubt it. It would be difficult to remove the studs in the spring.
 

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Really? FWD?? I remember as a kid, my Dad had a Plymouth Fury III with a HUGE trunk (could stack about 6 dead bodies in there ... at least!). It was a RWD vehicle. He couldn't make it up the street off the main drag to turn onto our street (and it was barely much of an incline).

My wife had a 1962 Impala. With mud and snows that car was great in the snow.
 

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My wife had a 1962 Impala. With mud and snows that car was great in the snow.

My first car was a used 64 2 door hardtop Impala, with a 327 and slip and slide Powerglide. Back in those days before modern snow tires we used what they called "sawdusts" which were actually recaps with crushed walnut shells in the tire compound. They wore fairly quickly but actually worked quite well due to the surface of the tire always being quite rough. The first modern dedicated snow tire I used were Goodyear F32's which also worked quite well due to the incredible amount of siping they had.
 

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My wife had a 1962 Impala. With mud and snows that car was great in the snow.
Back then, I'm certain he had snow tires on that "boat". The back end just weighed nothing ... and then that big V8 up front ... and his 200 lbs in the driver's seat.

My father didn't pick very good vehicles. In 2016, a couple of years before he died, he traded in his 2005 (?) boxy-style Malibu for a better-looking 2008 Malibu that was absolutely impossible for him or my mother to get in and out of! My son drives it now and has no difficulty, of course, but I've gotten into it and I can't stand it. Just a bad choice for someone his age ... but it IS pretty good in the snow (I think)...
 

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I pulled a 2 place snowmobile trailer into the ADK's with my '67 Chevelle and a '79 Dodge van for years until I got 4wd vehicles. Worst RWD car in snow I ever had was a '68 GTO. 64 beetle was good until you tried to bust over a plow mound, flat bottom was like a ski, up you went on top with the tires hanging. Snows on a RWD and I'll take it where no FWD will ever go. Ice then it's studs or chains or 3 ft at a time on grip strips. 46 yrs of driving Co. vans in snow taught me a lot about winter driving like I stole'em. LOL
FWD as soon as the right front breaks traction your headed for the ditch. RWD at least you have steering as your spinning the rears keeping momentum up going up that hill sideways. First good snow I head for a open parking lot to see how a newly acquired vehicle behaves in it.
 
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I always worried that studded tires would have longer stopping distance on clear roads, but did not know for sure.
This article shows the stopping distance with studs on a clear road is 12% more.
https://www.outsideonline.com/2359001/studded-tires-winter-car-prep
Yes less grip on dry roads. My 'bu easily spins the fronts with the studs but I keep that in mind as not to grind'em off needlessly. Kinda like having a big motor, get it rolling before getting on it, everything has it's trade offs.
 
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