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My Father retired and My brother retired from GMC. I have owned 6 GMC SUVS. I was loyal to them and they were not loyal to my wallet. Over the years it’s been breakdown after breakdown. On Christmas Eve we had a terrible storm here in NJ and I had to travel to my brothers which is a hour away. I own a 2015 terrain. Driving home the windshield wiper transmission broke and I can no longer see on the highway and just by luck there was a turnoff on the highway where I turned off and parked the car. I had to call a Uber at 12:30 a.m. for me and my family to get home. My mechanic ordered the part and showed me how cheap the part was made using plastic knuckles and pins to hold the bars in place. Never again. I have been to several mechanics that tell me the same thing “ If it wasn’t for GM I wouldn’t be in business” I went down to Honda and bought a Passport and it’s one of the smoothest rides I’ve been in. Goodbye GM! You should have made better vehicles!
 

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LOL all those Honda's parked in the back of the dealer are just there for oil changes.
Buddy's '18 CRV transfer case is toast at 40k miles. He's lucky he got the extended warranty. I'll take a cheap easy wiper fix over a transfer case any day.
 
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My Father retired and My brother retired from GMC. I have owned 6 GMC SUVS. I was loyal to them and they were not loyal to my wallet. Over the years it’s been breakdown after breakdown. On Christmas Eve we had a terrible storm here in NJ and I had to travel to my brothers which is a hour away. I own a 2015 terrain. Driving home the windshield wiper transmission broke and I can no longer see on the highway and just by luck there was a turnoff on the highway where I turned off and parked the car. I had to call a Uber at 12:30 a.m. for me and my family to get home. My mechanic ordered the part and showed me how cheap the part was made using plastic knuckles and pins to hold the bars in place. Never again. I have been to several mechanics that tell me the same thing “ If it wasn’t for GM I wouldn’t be in business” I went down to Honda and bought a Passport and it’s one of the smoothest rides I’ve been in. Goodbye GM! You should have made better vehicles!
I am right there with you, buddy. I've owned over 21 cars in my life including a HHR, Colorado and an older 98 monte carlo and except for the Terrain none of them used oil, or had PCV issues that could blow out the rear main seal but I absolutely can't in good faith buy another GM product and risk having to check the oil literally every single time I fill up with gas, or risk having a PCV hole that I can't see without pulling the intake manifold off getting clogged or frozen shut. And people trying to talk up GM saying there's a special coverage campaign. What about the fact that the coverage that was offered to people with the 2.4L ecotec engines was intentionally stopped before 2014 model years. They could say that the class action suit was before 2014 and so was the settlement but it's 2021 and we now know that 2014 model year ecotec engines were impacted as well. Where's GM's "We are here for our customers" support for those people?
 

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Good luck with the Honda. Personally I think they are terrible cars. My mom has had more issues with her 18' CRV than I've had with my Equinox. The CRV has a service bulletin for oil dilution and things related to the safety suite. Every automaker that pushes innovation will have certain misses from time to time. The reason Toyota's are known for reliability is because they are about as basic as they come. They are always behind on the technology front with the exception of hybrids. You either get a modern car that may have teething pains, or you pay for a generation behind car that should be sorted out.
 

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No automaker is perfect. GM is not perfect, but they also cannot warranty vehicles forever for every little glitch/quirk that may come up...no automaker will do that.

Toyota has a known issue with current generation RAV4 Hybrid models with owner's being unable to completely fill the fuel tank. They have provided a remedy but only up to a certain manufacturing date. Owners with cars after that date are having the issue as well, but Toyota is telling them they aren't covered.

Ford is having surface rust issues on the suspension/frames of brand new 2021 Ford F150s, but they insist this is normal and are offering no remedy.

I had a new VW years ago that literally said in the owner's manual to get into the habit of checking the oil level at every fuel fill up. The dealer service department also reiterated that to customers when going in for service.

Part of trading cars is understanding that you are most likely trading away one set of issues for another set of issues.
 

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@gasman, things break ... nothing lasts forever ... however .... I'm gonna agree with bashing GM here because no way should they have installed a wiper assembly that had moving parts (especially on something as important as a windshield wiper motor) relying on plastic rivets (if I'm understanding the design correctly).

And yeah ... you could say ... "well, the motor itself can always fail suddenly, too ... there's no redundancy there ... so what's the difference?"

The difference is - you deliberately (and needlessly ... although maybe you saved some money?) introduced another failure point on a function that needs to be as reliable as possible!

That's piss-poor design.

And it shows dereliction of duty by the design team, by the quality team, and by anybody at GM who signed off on it (and many probably signed off on it not even knowing what they were signing off on)!

It really makes you wonder ... where does the buck stop at GM? Who's the person or department that finds these kinds of things and weeds them out? Apparently this person or department doesn't exist at GM, or "certain people above these people" silence these whistleblowers ... and then something bad happens ...

Terrible.
 

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The use of plastic bushings in windshield wiper linkages/transmissions is common across the industry. GM, Ford, Toyota, Hyundai, etc. While it may not be the best choice for that application, it isn't just GM doing it. Unfortunately automakers care more about their bottom line than they do the overall ownership experience. The more money they can save assembling the car, the more profit they make per unit sold.

I am not a GM "Fanboy" or brand loyalist, and I do not plan on my next vehicle being a GM vehicle simply because I don't like anything they currently have to offer. However, criticizing them for doing something that other automakers are also doing is unfair. Especially after they extended the warranty on the wiper linkage/transmission to 10yrs/150,000 miles on 7 model years of vehicles.
 

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I remember when I first noticed that automakers were first replacing cast iron master cylinder reservoirs with plastic ones and I thought how cheap can they get, well I guess that was only the beginning and here we are. To be fair that probably was as much for weight savings as cost and I have not heard of any catastrophic plastic master cylinder reservoir failures. The weight savings fiasco is a topic in of itself, a losing battle due to bells, whistles, and doodads.
 

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So long not sure if your post is intended for our approval or to complain either way don't buy foreign and expect me to endorse or approve of it. As for saying goodbye don't let the door hit ya in your arse on your way out!
 

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I am not a GM "Fanboy" or brand loyalist, and I do not plan on my next vehicle being a GM vehicle simply because I don't like anything they currently have to offer. However, criticizing them for doing something that other automakers are also doing is unfair. Especially after they extended the warranty on the wiper linkage/transmission to 10yrs/150,000 miles on 7 model years of vehicles.
Yeah, I've heard that argument many, many, times before in these online forums ... "everybody else is doing it, so don't criticize just them"

I don't buy it.

It doesn't matter what 'everyone else' is doing. All that matters is what you're doing. And if you're OK with making poor decisions for your product, then that reflects poorly on you. It's just really weak to try to explain it away by saying ... "that's what everyone's doing".

And great - GM offered an extended warranty in this case, but if you were really managing things properly to begin with, you wouldn't have had to do that!

It's just disappointing when we've established an acceptable level of reliability on a product, and then somebody does something stupid like this ... for no good reason ... that compromises that safety level! Dumb and dumber.
 

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It is peculiar how a vehicle, whose purchase price is negotiated to the death, is expected after the sale to be exclusively made of over designed individual components.

Plastic can often a superior material to metal in the right applications. Plastic bushings can be impregnated with a lubricant(such as graphite) and last much longer than metal if correctly designed.

Correct design is the key, not the material itself. After all, carbon fiber is "just plastic" and they build million dollar supercars out of it.
 

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I had to replace the wiper arm bushings on my nephew's '12 Malibu. Probably the same ones as in a 'nox. His car had only 100k miles on it but spend most of it's life in FL, my '09 'bu with 190k miles still had OEM ones in it when I sold it. Identical wiper arm assembly's.
My car spent it's life in NJ so I suspect more wear from use in FL from the ''daily'' afternoon T storms.
Bushings where under $10 at AA . Snap fit for assembly line ease would be my reasons for them failing/wearing out.
Yet $1000 cell phones failing after a few years is acceptable or all those Honda / Acura 4 cyl. with bad rings burning tons of oil never get a mention but God forbid a timing chain goes bad.
Wait until the GM CVT's start failing but no mention of notorious Nissan's or Subaru's.
 

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Yeah, I've heard that argument many, many, times before in these online forums ... "everybody else is doing it, so don't criticize just them"

I don't buy it.

It doesn't matter what 'everyone else' is doing. All that matters is what you're doing. And if you're OK with making poor decisions for your product, then that reflects poorly on you. It's just really weak to try to explain it away by saying ... "that's what everyone's doing".

And great - GM offered an extended warranty in this case, but if you were really managing things properly to begin with, you wouldn't have had to do that!

It's just disappointing when we've established an acceptable level of reliability on a product, and then somebody does something stupid like this ... for no good reason ... that compromises that safety level! Dumb and dumber.
As soon as one automaker (or subcontractor) establishes an acceptable, serviceable, affordable method to assemble a particular part it carries over throughout the industry and eventually becomes the standard. It has been that way forever in the auto industry. It may seem like a weak excuse, but it is reality. The engineers designing parts are bound by a budget and are forced to make design decisions accordingly. Polyurethane bushings would be more durable, but the added cost per assembly is more than the "bean counters" will allow after weighing that added cost versus potential warranty claims during the first 3yr/36K miles. That is the game they play on every component in a car.

I am sure if automakers really wanted to, they could all build a bulletproof car that only ever required routine maintenance and replacement of wear items. However, there is no money in that for them outside of the initial purchase (not to mention the purchase price for buyers.) They would go out of business selling cars that lasted forever and rarely ever needed servicing.
 

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I guess "lasts forever" and "seldom needs service" depend on your perspective. From mine, cars do last as near to forever as makes no difference.

I grew up with cars that needed 3000 mile/3 month oil changes, fan belts and hoses every 30,000 miles(if you were lucky) and so on. Fifty years ago major engine work by 100,000 miles was normal, today it is a design defect.

We are living in the good old days.
 

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As soon as one automaker (or subcontractor) establishes an acceptable, serviceable, affordable method to assemble a particular part it carries over throughout the industry and eventually becomes the standard. It has been that way forever in the auto industry. It may seem like a weak excuse, but it is reality. The engineers designing parts are bound by a budget and are forced to make design decisions accordingly. Polyurethane bushings would be more durable, but the added cost per assembly is more than the "bean counters" will allow after weighing that added cost versus potential warranty claims during the first 3yr/36K miles. That is the game they play on every component in a car.

I am sure if automakers really wanted to, they could all build a bulletproof car that only ever required routine maintenance and replacement of wear items. However, there is no money in that for them outside of the initial purchase (not to mention the purchase price for buyers.) They would go out of business selling cars that lasted forever and rarely ever needed servicing.
I get what you're saying, but I just think functions pertaining to safety should be maintained to the highest level of reliability. That means you don't use flimsy plastic parts where they will see a lot of wear and tear ... and definitely not on windshield wipers because they're gonna fail when you need them the most! Some old lady driving in a rainstorm suddenly loses her wipers, can't see past the end of her hood, panics, and crashes the car against a tree or pole on the side of the road (or goes directly into oncoming traffic and kills people in the other car)!

It's really common sense, but nowadays, in this country, common sense need not apply. It's all about looking for the next way to make more money ... so that means ... cut costs. So you cut costs by using parts that are less expensive to manufacture or buy. And it (apparently) doesn't matter where you do it. How about wheels made out of "pot-metal"? Could save a lot of money there! And it's only a problem if you hit a pothole - then the rim shatters into several pieces. But who cares? You save $100 on the manufacturing cost of every wheel, and how many people will actually die riding on these rims (??).... very few .... probably...
 

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I guess "lasts forever" and "seldom needs service" depend on your perspective. From mine, cars do last as near to forever as makes no difference.

I grew up with cars that needed 3000 mile/3 month oil changes, fan belts and hoses every 30,000 miles(if you were lucky) and so on. Fifty years ago major engine work by 100,000 miles was normal, today it is a design defect.

We are living in the good old days.
They way cars are built these days, just doing something like changing spark plugs can be a "major service" depending on how much other stuff needs to come out to get to the plugs.

During the whole VW diesel emissions debacle, VW told federal investigators that their vehicles were built with an intended service life of 150,000 miles. If that is the general metric in the industry, that is about a 10 year service life based on the average of 15,000 miles per year. Now that cars are basically rolling computers with sensors, radar systems, touchscreen interfaces, etc. that 10 year service life seems a bit optimistic.
 

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Colt Hero, you are talking nonsense and worse, you are being malicious about it. Nobody goes to work in the auto industry with attitudes you ascribe to them. They are hard working people who have the same good and bad qualities as the rest of us.

Taking every single problem with an incredibly complex piece of machinery and turning it into a blanket indictment of the whole process is either ignorant or just hateful.
 

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