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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our 2019 Redline has about 27,000 miles on it. The factory tires (Hankook Ventus Noble 2 19") still have .17" tread left - well above the state's minimum 2/32". Wear is even on all 4 tires. Any standing water at speed causes some worrisome hydroplaning sensations. I think part of the problem is the width of the tire versus the weight of the vehicle.
Anyone else having these issues, and are there any recommendations for a replacement tire that is a little less flighty?

Come wintertime and these tires don't provide very good traction on snow either. I got stuck in an embarrassingly small amount of snow in a dooryard. I'll probably buy replacement wheels and snow treads this fall. Any suggestions on steel wheels that will fit?
 

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I have an 18 nox on the 17" rims with the oem tires. 50% warn tires, 5/32" tread depth and I get hydroplaning easily when conditions are right. Doesn't take much, 70 mph with standing water over the road. I have the oem Michelins.

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Hydroplaning is caused by a combination of standing water on the road, car speed, and under inflated or worn out tires.
70 mph with water standing on the road, yikes.
 

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I say easily based on may last two vehicles. Previous to the Nox I had a 17 Rav4 that didnt have much tire wear since I only owned it for 12 months. It as a result likely still had at least 8/32 tread depth. Before that I had an '06 explorer which was tank like and had A/T tires. Both would handle similar conditions with no hydroplaning like I have felt on the Nox. I'm going to be replacing the tires before winter hits and seriously considering the all weather tires from Michelin. Seem to have generally good reviews plus appear to be pretty good in the snow which we get occasionally.

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I found on the track slicks start to hydroplane around 45MPH. Just stay below that speed in the rain or get new tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think it's more a matter of tire width. A motorcycle, is surprisingly stable on wet roads. It's tire has a contact area about the size of my hand. I'm pretty fussy about tires - I replace them long before the law requires.
Driving 45 mph on rainy roads around here could be more dangerous than hydroplaning.
 

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FWD you have to slow down. Most rain spin outs are lighter FWD vehicles if you notice what's lost it's bumper cover on the guard rail or who's parked in the median in rain incidents.
Front right hydroplanes, looses traction, spins faster then regains traction and pulls right inducing counter steering or just a spin from LF driving vehicle only. Same as in snow, FWD looses traction and not only forward grip is gone but steering is gone also.
RWD you just ''feel'' the front get ''light'', let off gas to slow down and grip comes back as rears still have traction from fronts ''clearing'' the rain off the road in front of them. AWD acts the same way.
Over 55 mph in heavier rain all bets are off unless you running specific rain tires and even then depth of water is the unknown factor.
Decades of drive time in Co. vehicles being able to drive'em like I stole'em has taught me well LOL.
 
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I think it's more a matter of tire width. A motorcycle, is surprisingly stable on wet roads. It's tire has a contact area about the size of my hand. I'm pretty fussy about tires - I replace them long before the law requires.
Driving 45 mph on rainy roads around here could be more dangerous than hydroplaning.
It's those painted lines and crosswalks that will bite you on a motorcycle.
 

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.17 is a little more than 5/32. Most tires are pretty much done at 4/32 for anything other than fair weather driving. Tread wear indicators become flush with the tread at 2/32.

The Hankooks are Ultra High Performance all season tires. You could probably go to a touring or grand touring type of tire for a better ride and more neutral handling. If you want sharper handling and a firmer ride than a touring type tire, look at the High Performance all season category instead of Ultra High Performance.

Chevy really shouldn't be putting Ultra High Performance tires on the Equinox. They probably chose them simply because Hankook won the "lowest price, technically acceptable" criteria that most automakers use for parts.
 

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It's those painted lines and crosswalks that will bite you on a motorcycle.
Not to mention grated bridges in a rainstorm. My riding days are over now but many years ago successfully crossed one between Hoquiam and Aberdeen,Wa. on a KZ1000 by slowing well down prior to crossing and gradually applying throttle in a higher gear in effect lugging the motor as not to cause rear wheel spin. Had Contis on it then that was a harder compound than the Dunflops that the bike came with.
 

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.17 is a little more than 5/32. Most tires are pretty much done at 4/32 for anything other than fair weather driving. Tread wear indicators become flush with the tread at 2/32.


.
Makes you wonder why they put the wear bars so low. Tires are not safe well before getting to that point but I bet most people wait until they get there to get new tires.

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Makes you wonder why they put the wear bars so low. Tires are not safe well before getting to that point but I bet most people wait until they get there to get new tires.

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Very true. I know that I start shopping for new tires around the 4/32 mark and replace them as soon as possible. Never have had a tire get down to the wear bars...that is just too sketchy for me.
 

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In my university days I knew a guy that was actually driving round on the metal belts (on a mustang no less). Beyond foolish!
For me it usually comes down to a decision on if I think I can get through the winter on the all seasons I have on or change them out before the snow hits. This makes my tire purchase by about where I am at now (5/32"). I'm likely going to change to all weather tires this time to see what they are like and to get the benefit of better winter traction over new all seasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Lots of great information! Thanks, repairman54 - I'm relatively new to FWD cars and the points you made are very helpful. One rainy day earlier this year I counted 7 cars off the road I-95 in a 50 mile stretch - all were still right side up. Back in the 80's a young man I supervised was driving his dad's 1/2 RWD PU to training - a good sized vehicle. He hydroplaned and had massive life changing injuries. He was a cautious driver too. It really sucked to be a boss through that situation.
In Maine despite low industry most of the travel lanes (right lane) have tire ruts and collect water.
 

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The Hankook Ventus is a poorly rated tire and I got them off my vehicle within the first year and replaced them with Falken WildPeaks. If you look the Ventus up on TireRack they are rated 26 out of 29 in the Ultra High Performance category. I found them to be fair on dry pavement but they sucked in any kind of weather.
 

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Our 2019 Redline has about 27,000 miles on it. The factory tires (Hankook Ventus Noble 2 19") still have .17" tread left - well above the state's minimum 2/32". Wear is even on all 4 tires. Any standing water at speed causes some worrisome hydroplaning sensations. I think part of the problem is the width of the tire versus the weight of the vehicle.
Anyone else having these issues, and are there any recommendations for a replacement tire that is a little less flighty?

Come wintertime and these tires don't provide very good traction on snow either. I got stuck in an embarrassingly small amount of snow in a dooryard. I'll probably buy replacement wheels and snow treads this fall. Any suggestions on steel wheels that will fit?
The best tires I’ve found for my wife’s 2013 Terrain has been the Hankook Kinergy. They are great in the snow, mud and water. These have a 90,000 mile warranty.
 

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.17 is a little more than 5/32. Most tires are pretty much done at 4/32 for anything other than fair weather driving. Tread wear indicators become flush with the tread at 2/32.
Absolutely agreed. I saw my kid's tires were at 4/32" and I insisted she get the tires replaced. (She had never had to replace tires before.) She did and later told me she could not believe how much better the car stopped even on dry pavement.
 

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Living in the SW with brutal temps, sun exposure and relatively low mileage accumulation I never have to worry about tread depth when it comes to tire replacement. It typically takes 5 to 6 summers to turn a typical OEM tire into a rolling rock with some weather cracks starting in the sidewalls.

After applying my Michelin fix of choice I have never failed to be amazed at how much the car/truck had deteriorated (in every way) due to the tire's deterioration.
 

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Chevy really shouldn't be putting Ultra High Performance tires on the Equinox. They probably chose them simply because Hankook won the "lowest price, technically acceptable" criteria that most automakers use for parts.
Wholeheartedly agreed here. A good set of all-season touring tires would be a better choice. The Equinox is NOT a performance car.

But check out the price of those Hankooks at Tire Rack.

They're not cheap and more suitable tires can be had for less money:
 
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