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After finishing a 2800 mile trip I found 4 tar like spots on my hood when I washed it. I tried to scrap them off with my fingernails, but they would not come off. I traveled through a lot of road construction areas while on this trip. Any suggestions on how to remove these without damaging my paint? This is on a 2016 model if it makes any difference.
 

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Most any bug and tar remover will do the trick. I use the one from Turtle Wax but there are many different ones out there from all the normal vehicle wash and wax companies.
 

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dwendt44 said:
Most bug and tar removers are largely kerosene. I've also heard that WD-40 will work too. ???
I tried that while I was washing the car and it did not work.

I use to keep a can of bug-n-tar removal, but I did not know if it would damage the newer clear coat paints.
 

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I've never had tar on the hood of a vehicle but the bug and tar remover I use takes tar, that has sprayed up on the doors, off every well with no harm to the clear coat paint.

We certainly wouldn't want to mess up our Siren Red paint job. :cheers:
 

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Try Bug & Tar remover like has been suggested. Just be careful how you remove the tar. You don't want to grind the tar into the paint which can produce micro scratches. I'd also apply wax to the affected areas.
 

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Goo-B-Gon will remove tar and it a citrus based cleaner that won't harm paint.

A drop or two on the tar or apply some on a soft scrap cloth, let sit for a few minutes, gently rub the spot(s) of tar, then take a clean cloth scrap rag and wipe off. Repeat if some tar remains. Then wipe/wash the area down with car wash and rinse with water.

WD-40 works also, but wash immediately after with car wash and rinse.
 
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reubenray said:
This ended up being pine tree sap. The only way to get it off was to slowly pick it off.
Be careful with that method to avoid scratches. Much better to use a solvent to dissolve it. IMHO
 

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reubenray said:
This ended up being pine tree sap. The only way to get it off was to slowly pick it off.
Yes... That is very different from tar. I had that on my old Honda Civic which I had to park under a pine tree at an old apartment complex I lived in many, many years ago. It was impossible to get off without scraping (at least to the best of my knowledge at the time). Unbelievable how hard that stuff gets. I ended up using a flat head screwdriver to get it off and I definitely scratched the paint in doing so. Lesson learned...

JayT2014 said:
Goo-B-Gon will remove tar and it a citrus based cleaner that won't harm paint.
Goo Gone is great for cleaning white walls and raised white lettering on tires too.
 

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reubenray said:
After finishing a 2800 mile trip I found 4 tar like spots on my hood when I washed it. I tried to scrap them off with my fingernails, but they would not come off. I traveled through a lot of road construction areas while on this trip. Any suggestions on how to remove these without damaging my paint? This is on a 2016 model if it makes any difference.

You can gently use rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol or methanol or "Heat" to remove pine or tree sap. Apply it onto a soft old sock material, left it soften the sap by using just LIGHT pressure. You may have to apply several times.

It should start to dissolve the sap almost immediately but don't scrub it. You many have to make 3 or 4 applications because it will leave a residue. I just had two globs of baked on pine sap on my truck windshield from summer and used methanol. You then have to immediately wash the surface with a liquid car wash detergent or a little diluted simple green. Then use a good polish and/or cleaner wax to make sure any residue is gone and also protect the finish against further deposits.
 

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Back to JayTee2014 answer... on your tree sap

Tree Sap will come off using what JayTee2014 suggested...you might have to let is sit awhile, but it will soften it and remove to glob over a lot of elbow grease without damage to the clear coat.
 
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