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Discussion Starter #1
I just read this article in the Iron Butt magazine(a magazine for long distance motorcycle riders). Hope I do this attachment correctly.
The only myth I question is #3 It requires that the gas stations filters are working correctly. So I don't fill up when I see a tanker in the station just to be on the safe side.
When the customer service rep told me the reason I was getting such bad milage was brecause I wasn't using "top tier" gas - baloney! #4 disproves that and I have seen a different tanker in a Shell station once or twice.
#5 is strickly for the motorcycle community. Harley owners are always telling me I will destroy my bike if I keep using 87 octane. I have been using 87 in every vehicle I've ever owned from day one with absolutely no problems.
 

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A friend of mine has 93,000 miles on his 2005 Ultra Classic using nothing but the cheapest gas choice available(87 or 89). Bikes never needed a lick of work done beside normal maintenance.
 

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What exactly do they think will be destroyed with 87? Unless and engine is tuned for the higher octane there is no advantage whatsoever..
 

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I never fill up when I see a tanker at the station...been doing it for over 30 years...I have no way of knowing if it matters or not..just heard it from my parents as a kid..and it stuck..ha! :shrug:
 

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Harley's are air cooled and because of the design, run HOT! That may be the reason some run higher octane than needed.
Some models even shut off the rear cylinder when it gets to hot.

In some cases, high octane gas MAY, repeat MAY, result in better mileage. BUT is the extra cost worth the small amount of mileage improvement? (the computer reads no detonation and keeps the ignition advanced)

They don't mention raising the tire pressure; using synthetic oil, less 'junk in the trunk', etc....
 

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Speaking of the Weight's and Means inspections they are supposed to get (aren't they supposed to get them once a year, or maybe every two years?)...have you ever paid attention to the dates of the last inspection on the pumps you use? Often, they are from 4 yrs ago...they seem to be a little behind in Texas...lol, makes me wonder sometimes how correct it is though
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I read the certificate every time I get gas - there's nothing else to do while holding the nozzle, and eveyone I see are up to date.

You can turn that Harley feature on or off reguarding the rear cylinder turn off at idle and only at idle.
 

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GARYD said:
I read the certificate every time I get gas - there's nothing else to do while holding the nozzle, and eveyone I see are up to date.

You can turn that Harley feature on or off reguarding the rear cylinder turn off at idle and only at idle.
Same here. I remember reading somewhere that if the meters on the pumps were to fall out of calibration, the result is typically more actual flow then measured. In other words, it would benefit the consumer. That is why it is advantageous for the state/county/etc to keep their pumps calibrated.
 

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I buy premium fuel from one of two companys for my motorcycle & my small engine gas cans becuase I know they don't blend ethanol into their premium at either of those two places.
I don't mind running ethanol blended fuel in my Terrain or my Canyon but I can't put it in my 2 strokes and avoid it for all my small engine machines(even the 1200cc small engine in my bike).

Now since the energy content of ethanol is lower then gasoline, a pure gas premium will get better mileage then a 10-15% ethanol blended regular, but the mileage difference has nothing to do with the octane, just the BTU content of the fuel on a galon per galon basis.
 
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