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Discussion Starter #1
I am a hamradio operator and I am trying to find an access point through the firewall to run an antenna coax.
 

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you are lost buddy!
 

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Hamradio said:
I am a hamradio operator and I am trying to find an access point through the firewall to run an antenna coax.
Someone may have some ideas, which vehicle do you have or are thinking of getting?
Firewalls are fairly well sealed these days, but there should be some kind of conduit you can use or work around.
Welcome to the forum!



Roesterman said:
you are lost buddy!
I think Hamradio is looking for a way to get some Ham radio equipment hooked up in the vehicle???
 

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Ham radio in a vehicle?
 

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Roesterman said:
Ham radio in a vehicle?
I know, it would be one heck of antenna!
Maybe they have 1/64th wavelength antennas these days?
LOL!

:)

I couldn't think of anything else, just going by the nick LOL!
 

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Where do you mount the 12 ft antenna?
 

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You learn something every day!

from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_radio_station

Mobile stations


An amateur mobile radio station.
An amateur radio station installed in a vehicle is referred to as a mobile station. A typical mobile station is equipped with a transceiver, one or more antennas, and a microphone. The transceiver may be specially designed for installation in vehicles. It may be much smaller than transceivers designed for fixed station use, to facilitate installation under a seat or in a trunk, and it may feature a detachable control head that can be mounted in a separate location from the rest of the radio. Antennas designed for mobile stations must accommodate the unique physical constraints of the vehicle and travel lanes which it occupies, allowing for clearance under overpasses and bridges, and safe passage by vehicles in adjacent lanes. Most antennas used in mobile stations are omnidirectional. Few mobile stations are equipped to communicate with Morse code or digital modes. Most mobile stations are designed to be operated by the vehicle operator while driving.
Most transceivers installed in vehicles are designed to run on 12-16 VDC, and are generally powered by the starting battery in the vehicle. Because of the power demands placed on the vehicle battery, most mobile stations either do not include external amplifiers or include amplifiers with power outputs that are more modest than those commonly found in fixed stations.
A specialized form of mobile station used for competition in a VHF amateur radio contest in North America is called a rover station. A rover station is often designed to be operated by a passenger in the vehicle rather than the driver, and may include multiple transceivers, transverters, directional antennas, and a laptop computer to log contacts made.
While it may not be a regulatory requirement, many mobile stations will append a /M to end of their call sign (pronounced as "slash mobile" on phone) while operating to identify themselves to other stations as a mobile station. Rover station operating in a VHF contest will append a /R to the end of their call sign (pronounced "slash rover").
Maritime mobile stations are mobile stations installed in a watercraft, usually an ocean-going vessel. When in international waters, these stations are operated under the regulatory authority of the flag under which the vessel is registered. In addition to the regulatory requirements of amateur radio, operation of maritime mobile stations also requires the permission of the captain of the vessel. Maritime mobile stations append a /MM to end of their call sign (pronounced as "slash maritime mobile").
Aeronautical mobile stations are mobile stations installed in an aircraft. In addition to the regulatory requirements of amateur radio, operation of aeronautical mobile stations also requires the permission of the pilot of the aircraft. Aeronautical mobile stations append a /AM to end of their call sign (pronounced as "slash aeronautical mobile").
 

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Roesterman said:
Where do you mount the 12 ft antenna?
That's what I meant by the "1/64th wavelength antenna" comment.
As you, I envisioned the neighbour's huge antennas for their HAM radios.
I remembered that if an antenna is mounted on a conductive base, the length can be cut in half, as it's a function of the frequency, something like that anyway.

If, as in your post from wiki, they are operating in the VHF band, a large antenna would not be required such as those that operate short wave, for example.
Just going from memory, so hopefully not out in left field!

Hopefully, Hamradio comes back and helps us to understand a little more.
 

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SnowItch said:
My theory on life is that if I learn something new, I get to take a nap. Off to snooze...
I hear that and call.
You all have a good night!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the replys and hopefully you all learned something more about mobile Ham Radio. I have a 2010 Terrain SLT-2 that is one week old. The antenna I am trying to mount is 12" tall and works on the UHF radio band. The antenna would mount on a bracket that fits between the side fender and the hood. Doesn't sound like anyone has had any experience with getting a wire from the engine compartment to inside the passenger compartment?
 

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Hamradio said:
Thanks for all the replys and hopefully you all learned something more about mobile Ham Radio. I have a 2010 Terrain SLT-2 that is one week old. The antenna I am trying to mount is 12" tall and works on the UHF radio band. The antenna would mount on a bracket that fits between the side fender and the hood. Doesn't sound like anyone has had any experience with getting a wire from the engine compartment to inside the passenger compartment?[/color]
What SnowItch had posted is probably your best bet right now.
The Terrains are so relatively new that I don't think too many have been modded to any extent by Joe Public yet.

Do you have a 4 or 6 cylinder Terrain?
That may help as access from the passenger to the engine compartment may differ between both.

Thanks again Hamradio and do keep us posted if you find a way so others can learn too.
 

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Hamradio, how did you finally get your antenna and power wires through the firewall?? I am installing a VHF/UHF Icom IC-208 and got panels removed, insulation pulled down and can not find a spare hole to bring the cables into the Terrain from the engine compartment. Planned antenna is the L bracket with NMO mount at hood fender seam. Some police vehicles in this area have their antennas mounted at this location.
 

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Hamradio....don't give up, it's probably easier than you think running wires through the firewall. I am also a ham radio operator (have been since 1983), and have run cables through numerous firewalls, although nothing as new as my Terrain. All my experience was with UHF/VHF rigs, never ran low band gear. Once you have some panels dropped down, look and see where the factory wires, cables, etc come through there is usually a big grommet around them for protection. I used to just fished my wires through their grommet, along with the factory wires, there was usually enough room. Sometimes I had to slit the grommet a bit with a utility knife and enlarge the hole a bit. Now, that's all assuming you can get your hand up there. Like I said, I never tried to run any wires through the firewall in my Terrain, but I'm betting there is at least one spot you can run you coax and/or power cable through.

Good Luck,

Dan, NC9T
 

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Dan
Thanks for the reply. I have panels off in the engine compartment and inside the cabin. The Terrain firewall is sealed up very well with lots of insulation and sound limiting panels. The wiring bundle, from the engine compartment is blocked on both sides of the firewall. Engine side has fuse panel mounted on another component, on the inside there is some electronic component with lots of wires going to it. I am looking at drilling a hole in the firewall (adding gromet) on the passenger side, less components on the passenger side firewall. I selected a VHF/UHF antenna mounted on the hood/fender seam to provide separation from the Terrain's multi use antenna on the roof.
 

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Sounds like a plan, Don. If you can see where you have a clear shot on the passenger side, go for it. I know there are grommets available to protect the wires. Good Luck.
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I finally gave up on trying to figure out how to run coax and power cables in the Terrain and took my vehicle to a commercial business that installs radios in fire and police vehicles. There are just to many obstructions in the fire wall, side posts and headliner that run the risk of damage. In two hours they completed the installation it looks neat and works very well. They mounted a 12" dual band Comet antenna on the roof, ran power through the firewall and mounted the radio under the passenger seat. I built a custom bracket for my ICOM 207H control head and mounted it in the empty space directly under the CD.
Scott
KD7NAX
 

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Scott

Thanks for info. Rig installation sounds great.

73
 
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