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Hello everybody. 2015 Chevy Captiva LS. I've been reading about the possible freezing of the pcv orifice due to moisture and carbon in the engine. I'm ahead as I want to be ready for the winter months to deal with this issue. The best and most truthful answer came from JayTee2014 in a forum from Feb. 2018. My questions is: do I use a 1psi, 2-5 psi, or the 20-200 psi pressure relief valve in the oil cap as explained in that forum? All three were shown on the forum from Feb. 2018. He got so tired of explaining the same thing over and over so he said he is done talking about this. I wish I could talk to him just once on this issue. It was also mentioned that the later models moved the pcv deeper and/or made it longer so this issue would not happen. Does my 2015 Capiva have the deeper pcv? According to the CARFAX, it was placed in service June of 2014. If anybody knows these two anwsers, I would deeply appreciate their knowledge. :smile:
 

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There has been much discussion on crankshaft rear main seal failure , and how to prevent it....on these forums
My 2 cents...
Root cause is high crankcase pressure caused by piston blow by.... and both clean and dirty PCV unable to let crankcase pressure escape.

read the threads on the subject, and decide which way you want to go. Obviously, an option to prevent rear main seal failure, is to not to drive your car when it is ice cold outside.

I use the c-f-m performance oil cap, plus a "radiator hose, to prevent crankshaft rear main seal failure..
"radiator hose" to duct away fumes, ... if ....
incase the cabin air intake at the base of windshield wipers is COVERED with snow and ice,
and the gasket that seals engine compartment from air intake does not "seal",
since even at idle crankcase does not see a vacuum.

Various choices.....See post 81 ==>
https://www.equinoxforum.net/18-faqs-links-recalls/10865-gm-service-bulletin-14882-blocked-pcv-valve-causing-rear-main-seal-failure-9.html

You ask about cracking pressures....spring pressure when using jayTee's original design solution,
For those of you with the fc219 oil cap try To blow air thru it with your lungs... ( you can't)
If you can not blow air Through the fc219 oil cap, that means the cracking pressure is greater then 1.3 psi. .....
But that also means no radiator hose is necessary, since it does not vent at idle.

# 2. Cfm oil cap has a cracking pressure is about( I am guessing) of 0.05 psi,,,
And
# 3 "billet" has a zero psi cracking pressure, since it is essentially a small hole in an oil cap,
Theoretically it should throw fuel trim codes when air is sucked into crankcase,
BUT IN THIS 4 cylinder 2,4 liter engine, it does not mess up fuel trims according to addidas. Notice in picture, the clear hose added by addidas to duct "crankcase fumes" to ground level..

I also have a "radiator hose" pressed onto cfm oil fill cap, on my equinox.
See picture on post 18...
https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engine-drivetrain/29159-2013-i4-oil-air-cleaner-flex-intake-2.html
Since the 2.4 liter equinox engine's crankcase is often under positive pressure even at idle, it is always venting....

Last year during the -10 degree F cold snap, Adidas in a very astute observation noticed that the cfm check valve ball was not "rattling" and venting .... at start up, after a very ice cold night see Post #36,
I believe, it is my opinion, check valve ball would break free, at less then 0.5 psi crankcase pressure, which is way before rear main seal fails,...
https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engine-drivetrain/25827-pcv-oil-breather-vaccum-pressure-rear-main-seal.html

Finally... again in my opinion,
in addition to no rear main seal failure in ice cold weather...
Keeping crankcase at zero psi ( or vacuum ) will make your engine last longer by having less crankcase mist being pressure cooked onto the inside of crankcase.
And
keeping crankcase at zero psi will keep crankcase gunk out of your clean side PCV breather hose and the air intake breather box it is connect to...
Breather box is located between air filter and throttle body.... and throttle body will also stay cleaner.
Because...... it is crankcase pressure that pushes crankcase "mist" and gunk up the cleanside breather hose, and into breather box.

Read all the threads ^^ in their entirety, to see the diagnostic journey of the various solutions to crankshaft rear main seal failure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I've been looking for a vented oil filler cap all over for my 2015 Chevy Captiva (though put into service June of 2014) and wanted that to be my solution. According to a few auto part stores, fc219 will not fit my car. Some have said that the pcv orifice location is down further and will less likely cause it to freeze up in winter. I'm not sure about that if it's true. The auto parts stores around here, St. Paul, MN, don't have a vented oil filler cap for my car and I can't find on online anywhere either. I don't see how it would be a different sized hole where the oil gets filled. I may have to go to a GM dealer and at least ask them if one exists. Also if the auto parts stores are telling me the truth. They must be because I just chatted with an ACDelco rep and they said they do not have a vented oil cap for this make and model. Thank you for your previous answer.
 

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The dirty side PCV orifice, is a 2 mm diameter hole, molded into the black color plastic nylon 6/6 air intake manifold,
and unlike all other vehicles dirty side PCV orifice's which sit high up in the crankcase, this equinox PCV orifice sits lower in the engine.
When it is ice cold outside, and after your car sits outside for hours, the entire engine, including dirty side PCV orifice will become stone cold. Perhaps the plastic (plastic is made from oil) dirty side PCV orifice/hole and very thick ice cold crankcase oil, and water in crankcase .... perhaps this dirty side pcv orifice/hole freezes shut, or at least restricts air flow from crankcase into air intake manifold.

You can see the dirty side PCV in the below link, it is the hole in the color picture with the drill bit in it, see bottom of page 3 and top of page 4. The clean side PCV breather hose is shown in the black and white sketch at the top of page 3.
Positive crankcase pressure, from piston blowboy, pushes crankcase gunk into the cleanside PCV breather hose, which in ice cold weather might freeze solid, resulting in crankcase pressure increasing so much that crankcase pressure blows a hole through the Viton brand plastic crankshaft rear main seal.

 
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Crankshaft rear main seal, failed in February 2019, in ice cold weather..,
A failed crankshaft rear main seal, from 2.4 liter ecotek engine...
Engine Oil was gushing out of engine thru this (smaller) hole all over pavement and shop floor as it was driven into shop.
the "hole" in above picture was made much larger, AFTER REMOVAL from crankshaft, the "lip seal" was torn larger after removal, .. once this seal was removed it was easy to continue to tear the "hole" larger...
.. the "hole" in rear main seal is at the hinge of the lip seal

In ice cold weather, high crank case pressure blew a Hole thru this crankshaft rear main seal............ the lip seal did NOT turn inside out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Need to prevent this! Thinking of going with pressure relief valve 1-5 psi seen on the 2018 thread.
 
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