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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know the front doors are triple sealed and the glass has a coating, but has anyone applied Dynamat to the rear doors to further reduce noise?
 

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At approximately 80 Lbs per 20 foot roll

And considering the major "noise complaint" is the buffeting with the rear windows down (which also occurs in lots of other vehicles as well)

Seems to be a lot of weight to add to a vehicle with so much ridicule of the MPG
I recognize you are only asking about the rear doors...but other areas on the Nox / Terrain lack "sound proofing" also such as the wheel wells...

Now if you don't care about MPG
and are instead trying to build a "sound stage" in the Terrain / Nox...that's different

But in that scenario...the floor / roof / doors / heck every interior panel including the firewall should be completely stripped and "matted" to do it right.

I've not read about anyone doing it yet...maybe on another Nox / Terrain forum...but not here
Maybe I missed the thread though
 

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Yeah, a lot of people don't think about how much weight soundproofing actually adds to a vehicle...and with pressure on manufacturers to meet increasingly difficult MPG averages, future vehicles won't get much if any quieter than they are today. Think about any car that you consider to be really quiet and isolated from the environment, and chances are it will be one of the heaviest in it's class. Incidentally, the Equinox/Terrain are generally considered quieter than their competitors (Rav4, CRV, Escape, Tucson etc..) and I found that to be true when doing test drives.

As for your original question, if you do a search here for "dynamat" you'll find a few threads discussing using it...but no real info from people who have done it. There is a thread somehwere that has a tutorial of sorts for removing the door panels, but I can't seem to find it.
 

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NoobNox said:
Think about any car that you consider to be really quiet and isolated from the environment, and chances are it will be one of the heaviest in it's class. Incidentally, the Equinox/Terrain are generally considered quieter than their competitors (Rav4, CRV, Escape, Tucson etc..) and I found that to be true when doing test drives.
IIRC the Nox / Terrain are also the heaviest in their class (speaks toward their comparitive quietness)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Great point about the weight issue & MPG. I'll consider this if I decide to seal them off.
 

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By the was I had a terrible growling /droning noise in my 2013 Equinox for over a year Dealer under coated it ,no help I had Car=Fi in springfield ,MO insulate it with Hush-mat from the rear clear to front $989. did not get rid of noise . finally I found that the left rear spring top rubber cushion had spring setting crooked dealer replaced rubber cushion ,and noise went away.leaving me with a well insulated car I have not noticed any less fuel mileage but it does ride better. also done the head liner. Thanks to that factory defect I spent about $1489.00 extra that I really should not had to because of no help from Dealer & Chev.com/
 

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hitchhiker11 said:
Thanks to that factory defect I spent about $1489.00 extra that I really should not had to because of no help from Dealer & Chev.com/
Yes, the dealer screwed up, but I, and I think others told you that their cars were not making the noise that you were describing, so you should have compared it with a car on their lot and when theirs was quieter, you should have made them fix yours to that standard, BEFORE you spent the $1500. But, good to hear that it is finally fixed - and now when you sell your vehicle you can advertise it as the quietest Equinox in the USA. And, only one person can claim that title !
 

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This may sound weird to a lot of people but up here in Alaska we use this stuff on our roofs, its on a roll, looks like Bear Bond in Nascar, its like a super sticky on one side of rubber sheeting, more like some sort of fruit roll of rubber and adhesive, called Ice and Water shield by Grace.

On my Silverado dually I replaced my door speakers with something better but while I had the door panels off I applied this stuff in at least three layers all on the metal inside doorskin, which is almost 3/4". Stuff when stuck to each other is nearly impossible to remove.

A poorman ******* version of sound deadening, I bought a roll at lowes for just over $100, After 9 years of it in I still have a limousine type of silence inside my Silverado. You can get better stuff at a higher cost though, to each their own.

And words of wisdom when reinstalling high power speakers and door fasteners, use locknuts and locktite.
 

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You would be surprised on how some of the car companies are damping noise in doors.

Some just use a small square sheet of rubber in the center to absorb noise and also make the door sound more solid when it shuts. I shut the back door on a Kia sedan and it sounded like a tin can. This was an example what cars with out any dampening sound.

There is a real art to sound control. Automakers spend a lot of time on it and try to do it in the lightest and simplest ways. In the end the high end cars get the most as MPG, weight and price are less of a factor.

Hell to fix any road noise I got the best stereo option.
 

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I just thought I should mention that another excellent type of material is those anti fatigue floor mats of close cell foam, like a memory foam, very dense stuff, you can get it at most big box hardware stores, or for a more affordable and lighter stuff I have used closed cell camping pads, the stuff you get cheap at walmart to sleep on. I used that stuff to box in speaker upgrades on my Goldwings because its very light.
 

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Now if you start getting into things that were not intended keep in mind about moisture and condensation.

Make sure the material will not create or catch condensation between it and the metal.
 

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Don't waste your money on Dynamat.

I ripped out my entire cargo area interior including sidewalls and installed this crap.... it was a beoytch to install, you'll slice your hands up to ribbons and the end results is that you won't notice any difference.

Even Dynamat corporate will tell you that they will NOT guarantee results. Especially if you only do selected areas. They say you have to encase your entire vehicle which will cost you hundreds of dollars and then it will add a few hundred extra pounds and who knows if it will work.

I bet I added 50-70 lbs just in my cargo area alone.

Do a search on 'Dynamat' in this forum and you will find my exhaustive post on my installation including photos and observations.
 

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What can you do with the Drivers and front Passengers Doors so they don't sound like a tin can every time you shut them?
 

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teetertotter said:
What can you do with the Drivers and front Passengers Doors so they don't sound like a tin can every time you shut them?
Actually, if that is what you are after - that is where Dynamat will help you.... Dynamat Xtreme. I put a few small patches of it (It is super-self-adhesive) on the inside of my rear quarter panels, thinking it might knock down road noise.... which it didn't, but when I did a 'before/after' knuckle thump on the exterior of the rear quarters, it went from a 'tinny' sound to a dull 'thump.'

This would work for your doors in the same manner.

It is a flat out 'bitch' of a project in that you have to disassemble your door panels, and possibly remove plastic coverings and some hardware to get access to the inside of your doors.... not to mention the non-sticky side of the Dynamat is laminated with a metal foil which is razor sharp.... so expect some minor lacerations on your hands and fingers before you are done.

But again - this will change the sound of the metal from a 'tinny' sound to a 'dull thud.'

I didn't put any in my doors but you can search Dynamat installations on YouTube and you will see video evidence that this works.

HOWEVER - it will not defeat any ambient noise entering your vehicle.... it just changes the accoustic signature of the metal it is applied to. Good for knocking out the metal vibrations if you have a ghetto sound system installed in your trunk too.
 

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Dynamat is fine but you have to know when, where and how to use it. Just sticking the stuff everywhere is not always going to solve issues. It works very well for most people.

There are just limits to everything and you are not going to turn a Nox into a silent SRX with an application to just one area. There really is a science to sound deadening and that is why most automakers do it in a sound lab not a garage.

The doors on tinny? Try the rear doors on that larger Kia sedan. Clang!
 

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All I can tell you is that I speak from experience. Look up my 'Dynamat' post. I expertly aligned and installed the entire cargo floor and halfwalls, including the inner rear quarter panels. Results? Nada.... no deadening of the encroachment of road noise.

I attained very limited, but better results going to Joanne Fabrics and purchasing 'pillow' stuffing.... and jamming it into the sidewalls of the cargo area between the plastic cargo sidewall trim pieces and the metal framework of the NOX.

GM doesn't do much more than that.... I had the entire side panels removed from the rear to the front... and all they have for sound deadening is a thin, cheap-azz material about 1/4" thick.

I talk from experience - not conjecture.

You can spend hundreds of dollars if you want... but in the end.... you will wish you would have listened to me.

I talked to Dynamat techs directly (after my install) and they told me I would not get results unless I lined every square inch of the car: cargo, rear hatch, doors, sidewalls, roof, etc.

Ok... so be prepared to spend over $1,000 on an experiment. Good luck.
 

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You are right on it did not help that much using Hush-mat ,after they replaced the spring rubber cushion I felt like the noise level was lower for a couple days but than it came back .I reckecked the left rear spring and it has slid back to the side and is rubbing on metal seat again. dealer is going to replace both cushions & spring this time.
 

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I've used polyester fiber-fill, like what you would stuff a pillow with, in my guitar and bass speaker cabinets...for years. In overly resonant hollow areas, especially in a door, it would be easy to use a piece of dowel to push some of the material everywhere that doesn't interfere with anything mechanical or hot. The light and resilient fiber expands (and retains it's shape) to fit it's surroundings, doesn't attract moisture and doesn't hold it if some gets into or on it. I wonder if this might work as a cheap 'n easy automotive sound dampener in some circumstances?
 

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For the people saying dynamat does not reduce road noise.... That's not its purpose. It was not designed to do that. If you want that you need to use a good closed cell foam. Also deadeners like Dynamat are designed to lower the resonating frequency of the metal and abosord the sound/vibrations and transfer into heat.
 

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Wileym said:
I've used polyester fiber-fill, like what you would stuff a pillow with, in my guitar and bass speaker cabinets...for years. In overly resonant hollow areas, especially in a door, it would be easy to use a piece of dowel to push some of the material everywhere that doesn't interfere with anything mechanical or hot. The light and resilient fiber expands (and retains it's shape) to fit it's surroundings, doesn't attract moisture and doesn't hold it if some gets into or on it. I wonder if this might work as a cheap 'n easy automotive sound dampener in some circumstances?
I've been wondering about doing this as well. But then I asked myself, if it's cheap, easy and effective, why don't OEMs do it? Must be some drawback. I was thinking: not fireproof? gets wet and moldy? does not stay in place? interferes with door mechanisms like window lifts, wiring, etc.?
 
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