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I purchased a 2010 / 2.4
So the intake is new also. And was drilled as the recall before install. When I remove the hose out of the valve cover, I get puffs of air out. Same with the oil fill hole, air puffs out, AT IDLE.
From my understanding, there should be, at idle, suction in to the valve cover and air coming out of the oil fill hole at idle.
I also have gotten the FC219 oil cap a while back just to be safe. I have no issues with it. Runs perfect. I don't have any condensation or oil in the air plenum. I'm trying to determine if the pcv orifice is stopped up or not.

My 2 cents,
my simple answer, like ""stopwatch"" said.....
the direction of air flow in the clean side PCV hose,
depends upon how you are driving....
And Specifically for this 2.4 liter GDI equinox
- if you are idling at a stop light, or are coasting with your foot off the gas, and have high intake manifold vacuum of 10 psi or greater,
And then air flows into crankcase from plastic airbox
OR
- if you are accelerating, or even driving with your foot gently on the gas pedal, then you have less then 9 psi of vacuum in your intake manifold,
And then crankcase gunk air, flows out of crankcase and into airbox.

====>>>> .....And my longer explanation .....
... and how to test your dirty side PCV orifice,
.... and ""creeprcris"" I do not think your dirty side PCV is plugged up.....
==>> --- most of the time, crankcase sees positive pressure, which is why I use the cfm oil cap, to keep crankcase at zero psi pressure, the Fc219 has a higher cracking pressure,,,,,,,,, say 1 psi....==>

For my 2013 Equinox with 40k miles and my 2016 Equinox with 19k miles.... both have 2.4 liter, 4 cylinder LEA Ecotec engine

AT IDLE air flows from the plastic "airbox" to the crankcase, via the cleanside breather hose
And then from the crankcase through the dirty side PCV into the intake manifold, and then through intake valves at the top of the combustion chambers (cylinder) and into the combustion chamber.

At IDLE, in my equinox's, the throttle body "butterfly valve" is closed, and the intake manifold sees about a 10 psi vacuum. ( as measured with my scan tool, OBD Link MX + that pairs up nicely with my iPhone.)

The vacuum comes from the pistons in the combustion chamber, when piston goes down, the piston sucks air into the combustion chamber, which creates a vacuum in the intake manifold.
Because the intake manifold is in a vacuum state,
in addition to sucking a little air of air past the closed throttle body butterfly valve ,
the intake manifold also sucks in air from crankcase via dirty side PCV, putting the crankcase is a slight vacuum. Thus the crankcase sucks in air via cleanside PCV breather hose from the airbox. The air in the airbox just flowed through the air filter, the air is clean.

The cleanside PCV hose is pictured at the top of page 3, in the black and white picture. Arrow 1 points to where it plugs into air box,
And the dirty side orifice is at the top of page 4, with the 1/16 inch drill bit partially inside the orifice.
https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2015/SB-10090101-2280.pdf

At IDLE, I measured the clean side PCV vacuum.
I do the test, using a manaometer, as described on page 3 of the above link,
At the clean air intake I get vacuum readings readings for both cars of about 0.25 psi of vacuum BUT then I instantly
stopped the test and removed the manometer, allowing air to flow into crankcase. By plugging up the clean side PCV air intake with the manometer, The crankcase achieved a vacuum of of 0.25 psi, which is sufficient to suck air into crankcase via crankshaft rear main seal, and it made a horrible whistling sound.
,.... as soon as I heard the Whistling sound, I discontinued the test. My manometer measured a crankcase vacuum about 0.25 psi,
and
==>>> according to that ^^^ gm document, my dirty side PCV orifice is not plugged.<<<<====

I also measured CRANKCASE vacuum at OIl CAP at IDLE.
Using a manometer, and using the oil cap shown on post number 15, on the below link, I was able to hook up my manometer to that oil cap. Then I measured crankcase vacuum.

https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engine-drivetrain/25827-pcv-oil-breather-vaccum-pressure-rear-main-seal-2.html#/topics/25827?page=3

--> My 2016 equinox has a crankcase vacuum at idle of about 0.017 psi vacuum.
And my 2013 Equinox has a bit less crankcase vacuum of about 0.009 psi of vacuum.
The vacuum ^^ is so little, that it is almost zero.

This also makes sense, ^^ since the intake manifold has a vacuum of about 10 psi, and it sucks air into the intake manifold from the crankcase via the dirty side PCV orifice,
and air is flowing into crankcase via cleanside PCV breather hose.
Remember when I plugged up the clean air PCV breather hose, crankcase vacuum went instantly to 0.25 psi of vacuum and then the horrible whistling sound.

AT IDLE with the oil cap off, I feel PUFFS of air coming out of crankcase,
BUT,
how can it be that PUFFS escape the crankcase out the oil filler hole? ? Since i measured a vacuum on the crankcase of 0.009 and 0.017 psi? The vacuum should suck air into crankcase. And my dirty side PCV is not plugged up according to the GM test?

My guess is, that crankcase pressure fluctuates. Even though I measured it at a uniform 0.009 psi vacuum, I think the crankcase pressure probably very quickly fluctuates between plus 0.1 psi pressure and minus 0.1 psi vacuum,
so fast, that my manometer shows a steady 0.0009 psi vacuum.
As the pistons go up and down, or as piston blow by occurs in each cylinder, the crankcase pressure goes up and then down giving a PUFFing sensation.


==> Theoretically, at idle,
no air should escape out the oil cap at idle. But this 4 cylinder engine does allow air to PUFF out of oil cap. With my cfm oil cap, I am venting these PUFFS, keeping crankcase at zero PSI.
My 6 cylinder 2017 Equinox, at idle does not "PUFF" air out of the oil fill hole when the oil cap is removed. <==

WOT.... WIDE OPEN THROTTLE....
During WOT,
the flow of air through the cleanside PCV breather hose is OPPOSITE to what was described above at IDLE.
During WOT air flows out of crankcase via cleanside PCV into the airbox.
In fact the "air" that flows out of crankcase through the cleanside PCV breathers hose during WOT is laden with crankcase fumes, crankcase moisture, and crankcase gunk.

((Side note==> It is these fumes, moisture and gunk, that can collect in the cleanside PCV breather hose, and when it is say freezing cold outside, 15 degrees F outsde and you are driving at 40 mph, the wind chill is probably -10F, and very quickly the crankcase moisture and gunk in this cleanside breather hose will freeze solid, and stop the crankcase air from escaping via the cleanside PCV breather hose,
then boom, you could have crankshaft rear main seal failure..... ))

I would bet, that if you could put your hand over the opened oil fill hole, while the car is accelerating (WOT) you would feel lots of air blow out the oil fill hole.

Less intake manifold vacuum during WOT results in less suction of crankcase gasses from crankcase via dirty side PCV into the intake manifold.
When I am accelerating hard, I measure intake manifold vacuum at 0 psi,
This makes logical sense since the throttle body "butterfly valve" is wide open, letting as much clean filtered air into the intake manifold as possible. Thus intake manifold vacuum is zero, and it is not sucking air out of crankcase via dirty side PCV.
And when while cruising at 60 mph the throttle body is partially opens and intake manifold vacuum is 3 psi.

In summary, the crankcase sees a POSITIVE crankcase pressure during those WOT ^^ conditions for two reasons.
1. More piston blowby
2. Less intake manifold vacuum
So the air flows out off the crankcase via cleanside PCV hose and into air box.
 

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Thank you for the detailed info. But I'll say it adds to my confusion even more now because, more conflicting info. from another post regarding the pcv it's stated at 2k rpms there should be air being sucked into the valve cover hose. And to test, stick a peice of paper against it and it should suck the paper to it. And mine has air coming out of the valve cover hose at 2k rpm. Not sucking and the paper won't stick.
******


said - Well the GM TSB on this stuff stated to check the air pressure at the clean side PCV port in the valve cover. They said to use a meter, but one can use a piece of paper. Disconnect the clean side hose from the port, start the motor, rev to 2000 RPM, place the paper up to the port. If it holds the paper, the air is flowing properly. If it will not hold it, then in all likelihood the PCV internally is blocked. If one can feel air coming out of the valve cover port, then no doubt whatsoever that things need fixed.... and fast.
*******

I'm the same thread, it's mentioned one can remove the valve cover and clean the orifice quite a bit easier than removing the HFP and intake. Are there any detailed instructions on this anywhere?
 

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. it's stated at 2k rpms there should be air being sucked into the valve cover hose. And to test, stick a peice of paper against it and it should suck the paper to it. And mine has air coming out of the valve cover hose at 2k rpm. Not sucking and the paper?
The valve cover hose is clean side PCV hose on our 2.4 liter equinox

I tried paper test also, and paper did not stick. The paper did not seal against Clean side PCV snap pit connector, because of gaps in barbs on the connector, let air past, thus no suction.

The "vacuum" test with paper..... if you are putting the paper where arrow 1 points...--->>The cleanside PCV hose is pictured at the top of page 3, Arrow 1.....
https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2015/SB-10090101-2280.pdf

If you are putting piece of paper where arrow 1 points^^^^
the piece of paper, that is not going to stick,
BECAUSE the barbed snap fitting has "snap fit" slots in it to attach the clean side breather hose into air box
AND those slots allow air into breather hose
Hence paper will not stick

GM test Page 3, item 4 says 1500 RPM. Not 2000, These RPM's are at idle and in PARK, so probably less critical to test... probably makes little difference,

When I did the GM manometer test (see link above) I was pulling a vacuum of 0.25 psi
Then I stopped the test because of the whistling noise of air being sucked, into crankcase, through rear main seal.
A 0.25 psi vacuum would make your papaer stick if you stuck paper against a flat surface.


TRY THIS INSTEAD,
Buy a piece of clear pvc plastic tubing with 1/2 inch iD, say a 10 foot in length for $8 from Home Depot.
The 1/2 inch Inner diameter hose should push over the snap fit slots, and butt up against the blue o-ring on the cleanside PCV hose as shown by arrow 1 (above)
THEN put a piece of paper at the flat end of the hose.
If a vacuum it should stick. Put your thumb over end of hose, and stop all air flow into crankcase via clean side PCV, and you might create the awful whistling noise.
Simple plan A ^^

Complicated PLAN B... make your own manometer.
loop the 10 foot 1/2 inch ID hose so there is a tight U shape in it.
And attach the U shape hose to a piece of wood (with zip ties or metal staples as in video)
Put water at the bottom of the U, going up 12 inches, from bottom of U
Have someone else start the car, so that when whistling sound begins, you can instanly unplug 1/2 hose from arrow 1.
Then measure the height the water is sucked up ( vacuum) from start height.

Here is utube video of idea of water manometer...except you would have 1 end of hose plugged in to "arrow 1"
And wood and u shape would be on pavement in front of car

And

PLAN c
Buy a manometer.

To be clear,
on my three 2.4 liter equinox's, air PUFFs out of my cfm oil caps,
And when I test at "arrow 1"
I pulled a vacuum of about 0.25 psi, and then I ended measurement because of horrible whistling sound.
THUS my dirty side PCV passed the GM "blocked dirty side PCV" test,

FYI
If you make a water manometer
Here is conversion for inches of water to PSI
https://www.convertunits.com/from/PSI/to/inch+of+water+column

And conversion of psi to inches of Hg
https://www.convertunits.com/from/inches+of+mercury/to/psi
 
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Thanks again for your detailed information. It was very helpful. I had my wife hold the throttle at about 1500-1700 rpm, the paper was sucked against the hose coming from the valve cover. I guess that's why the TSB calls for that amount of rpm. So I guess my pcv is functioning properly.
 

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This is alot of info to read through. Only thing I never saw was an example of a catch can installed on the dirty side of the pcv system. Anyone have pictures of which hose that should be on? I have a 2017 with the 2.4. No issues yet, just considering a catch can as a preventative measure. I currently have the FC219 oil cap as well.
 

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I bought the vented delco, couple bucks off amazon. Haven't noticed anything change. Possibly just better safe then sorry ease of mind.
Be nice to know if there is any way to track if ones who have made the change over the years haven't had the seals blow or have.

Certainly doesn't hurt I guess.
 

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This is alot of info to read through. Only thing I never saw was an example of a catch can installed on the dirty side of the pcv system. Anyone have pictures of which hose that should be on? I have a 2017 with the 2.4. No issues yet, just considering a catch can as a preventative measure. I currently have the FC219 oil cap as well.

For the 2.4 liter, 4 cylinder ecotec engine,
The dirty side PCV
Is a hole (orifice)
In the plastic intake manifold which is located after the throttle body

You can NOT put a catch can on the internal dirty side PCV orifice.

Check the following link to a gm bulletin

https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2015/SB-10090101-2280.pdf

The line drawing at the top of page 3 is the clean side PCV
The color picture at the top of page 4, with the drill bit in it.... is the dirty side PCV.

You can NOT put a catch can on the internal dirty side PCV orifice.
 

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My question is, does the oil cap do any good or not?
My 2 cents
For this 2.4 liter , 4 cylinder ecotec engine,
Oil cap type does make a difference.

1
If you had the cfm oil cap (oil cap with check valve) ,
or the "billet with no check valve" oil cap,
then you would see no gunk (significantly less gunk)
in the clean side PCV hose
COMPARED TO THE OEM OIL CAP OR FC210 oil cap

The fc219 oil,cap does not vent, UNTIL
until after crankcase pressure is greater then say 1.5 psi in pressure.
Folks have tried to blow thru FC219 oil cap when it was new, and were unable to do so. Folks can blow 1.5 psi with their lungs.

Theoretically, if clean side PCV "hose" freezes solid,
and dirty side side orifice can not vent crankcase pressure, then theoretically
the fc219 oil cap will allow crankcase pressure to escape through fc219 oil cap before high crankcase pressure ( say at 4 psi .. a random guess of 4 psi) results in crankshaft rear main seal,failure.
BUT
If crankcase Has say 0.2 psi pressure,
Then crankcase gunk will be pushed out the cleanside PCV hose and into the air Box. There is no doubt that many folks see gunk in airbox and cleanside PCV hose, just like comment #11 in this thread, where a catch can is put on clean side PCV post #1 in this thread.

I explain in more detail ... follow the link below. Post #2
https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engine-drivetrain/29813-post-lawsuit-2013-2-4l.html

2
A cfm oil cap would keep crankcase at almost 0 psi pressure,
Thus, lower crankcase pressure will keep inside of engine cleaner... less black varnish build up.
See post 95 in link below
https://www.equinoxforum.net/18-faqs-links-recalls/10865-gm-service-bulletin-14882-blocked-pcv-valve-causing-rear-main-seal-failure-10.html
 
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Or . . .. buy a pre 2018 Equinox/Terrain or current Acadia, Traverse, Buick Enclave . . etc with the 3.6L V6.
No pesky internal PCV fiasco and no turbo to complicate things. :grin:
 
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JayTee you mean pre '18, and you're slipping, you didn't give your sales pitch.
 

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My 2 cents

For this 2.4 liter , 4 cylinder ecotec engine,

Oil cap type does make a difference.



1

If you had the cfm oil cap (oil cap with check valve) ,

or the "billet with no check valve" oil cap,

then you would see no gunk (significantly less gunk)

in the clean side PCV hose

COMPARED TO THE OEM OIL CAP OR FC210 oil cap



The fc219 oil,cap does not vent, UNTIL

until after crankcase pressure is greater then say 1.5 psi in pressure.

Folks have tried to blow thru FC219 oil cap when it was new, and were unable to do so. Folks can blow 1.5 psi with their lungs.



Theoretically, if clean side PCV "hose" freezes solid,

and dirty side side orifice can not vent crankcase pressure, then theoretically

the fc219 oil cap will allow crankcase pressure to escape through fc219 oil cap before high crankcase pressure ( say at 4 psi .. a random guess of 4 psi) results in crankshaft rear main seal,failure.

BUT

If crankcase Has say 0.2 psi pressure,

Then crankcase gunk will be pushed out the cleanside PCV hose and into the air Box. There is no doubt that many folks see gunk in airbox and cleanside PCV hose, just like comment #11 in this thread, where a catch can is put on clean side PCV post #1 in this thread.



I explain in more detail ... follow the link below. Post #2

https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engine-drivetrain/29813-post-lawsuit-2013-2-4l.html



2

A cfm oil cap would keep crankcase at almost 0 psi pressure,

Thus, lower crankcase pressure will keep inside of engine cleaner... less black varnish build up.

See post 95 in link below

https://www.equinoxforum.net/18-faqs-links-recalls/10865-gm-service-bulletin-14882-blocked-pcv-valve-causing-rear-main-seal-failure-10.html
Wondering because I have been looking at a 12 at a dealer I trust. The pistons, rings and timing chain were done by them at 45K it has 73K on it now. It has the goodies I want and is in good shape and a good price.

Just want to know if I still would need to have to worry about the pvc thing or if anything like the oil cap can prevent that for sure.

I could wait for one with a 3.6L and everything I want but maybe not as nice or the price I want.

Guess I can only figure that out.
 

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Can't stress it enough . . . if you do not want StreSS . . . and further issues.


Look for a 3.6L V6. And . . the newer and lower the miles the better as with any used car, truck or SUV.

It really has become very painful to see people come here and at least ask before buying. . . . only to have them return a month to 8 months later and have oil burning or plugged PCV and main seal issues with BiG $$$$ repairs. :sad:
 
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Wondering because I have been looking at a 12 at a dealer I trust. The pistons, rings and timing chain were done by them at 45K it has 73K on it now. It has the goodies I want and is in good shape and a good price.
Just want to know if I still would need to have to worry about the pvc thing or if anything like the oil cap can prevent that for sure.
I could wait for one with a 3.6L and everything I want but maybe not as nice or the price I want.
Guess I can only figure that out.
My 2 cents
I would worry
, a dealer you trust, will he guarantee no problems for 30,000 miles? Of course, you would check oil and. Top it up every time you filled up with gas, and oil is cheap.

it is a GM product, run from the 4 cylinder.....
That ^^^ loaded gm junk, is probably already burning oil again ..... the previous owner drove exactly the same as when the first set of piston and rings failed, low RPM, used ECO mode... the damage is done to piston and rings..
Don't be suckered by the bells and whistles,
With the Wuhan virus, you are in the cat seat,
Wait for a V6, a low mileage V6

If you own a 4 cylinder gM crap ecotec engine,
Know it will burn oil and PVC it will freeze solid if you drive it in cold weather.
Vent your crankcase to make it last as long as possible.
Regardless, this heavy 4000 lb car,
With small 2.4 liter engine
Because of LSPI and you can't put a catch can on. It.. will burn oil, eventually
Don't buy the 2.4,

Take advice above poster, ^^^
Buy a new $40,000 gM car,
don't buy used gM 4 cylinder crap,
Or buy an Older V6, 2015 or newer,
And know,
by 100k miles it too, the V6' will be drinking oil, that is...oil consumption....
Unless......
My V6 has a catch can and a vented oil cap... I want it to last more then 100k miles, but who knows?
 
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Thanks for all the recommendations. Is this the same 3.6L V6 in the 2013 Impala? If so I have one of those with 180K on it and it doesn't burn any oil to speak of between changes. I didn't get it until it had 170K on it and don't know what was done before I got it.
 

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Is this the same 3.6L V6 in the 2013 Impala? If so I have one of those with 180K on it and it doesn't burn any oil to speak of between changes.
Yes the Impala started using the 3.6L LFX in 2012.
2013 was a short year, they only sold 2013's for a half year as they brought out the redesigned 2014's early.
Look at your RPO sticker in the glove box, it should say LFX.
 
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Yes the Impala started using the 3.6L LFX in 2012.

2013 was a short year, they only sold 2013's for a half year as they brought out the redesigned 2014's early.

Look at your RPO sticker in the glove box, it should say LFX.
What year did the Equinox start using it? Same?
 

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What year did the Equinox start using it? Same?
Equinox and Terrain went to the 3.6L LFX V-6 and the upgraded Gen II 6T70 transmission in Model Year 2013.
 
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