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What procedure have you been using to break-in your NEW vehicle. I doen't have mine yet, but in looking through a friend's owners manual, I thought it said something like not going over 65 or 70 for a few thousand miles, Can't remember exactly, but seems pretty restrictive. What did you do ?
 

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Dont worry about any break-in procedure. Dont jump in a floor it either without it warming up! Do some research and you will find that with todays newer motors and closer tolerances, you actually want to make sure you use the whole rev range and vary speeds to get a proper break-in.
 

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There is a specific procedure in accordance with the Owner's Manual. I followed it on my Terrain to the letter, but I've had new vehicles in the past that I just drove and never had any engine/powertrain issues. Of course those were leases unlike the Terrain so I thought it best I follow the engineer's instructions.
 

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I follow a fairly specific break-in procedure on my bikes, and the dyno shows that it makes a pretty significant improvement.

The link below details more, but essentially your first 50KM's/miles are crucial. Let your vehicle warm up thoroughly, and then take it out on a highway and let it run through the entire rev range, slowly and methodically. Following the owners manual, from a break in perspective, is actually the opposite of what you truly need to do. The whole 'don't go above 5000rpm for a couple thousand miles' is just in there for liability reasons. On a thoroughly warmed up engine, you should actually be running it fairly hard.

I follow this methodology on bikes of mine and it makes a few extra horsepower right out of the gate. At least in the motorcycle (sportbike) world, most people are very careful about how they break in the engine. Harley owners are also careful about this, because getting 3 extra horsepower from a good break in means double the horsepower! :D

There's debate on whether or not it matter a whole lot in the big picture in the car world anymore.

Good info on engine break-in. http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 

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I thought the Terrain/Equinox break-in procedure had more to do with the drivetrain than the engine. Something about seating the pinion to the ring gear in the rear differential.

And it was only during the first 500 miles I believe that you were supposed to vary the speeds and avoid sudden acceleration/deceleration.

It doesn't mean you can't rev the engine during break-in... I find the V6 has quite a wide operating range, RPM wise, anyway.
 

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scottyyyc said:
Harley owners are also careful about this, because getting 3 extra horsepower from a good break in means double the horsepower! :D[/color]
Snuck that one in there good, scottyyyc!
:)

Overall, all the posts in this thread have very good points to consider about break in.
 

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Break in periods are not nearly as important as they used to be. But I think there is one very important part, and it's also in the link provided by scottyyyc: Make sure to warm the engine up completely before shutting it down again. Basically no short trips for it's first few days/miles.

My father has retired from working as an engineer for the US Air Force. In his job he studied a LOT of engine failures on all of the aircraft flown by our service men. His biggest find had to do with metals and their reaction to heating and cooling. He found that if an engine is used in short bursts, then is allowed to cool that the materials can age and become less able to handle harder tasks later in their years. However, if an engine is allowed to fully heat to running temp before stopping, then the metals will become more used to this operating range, and work better over time. He even recommends never allowing an engine to partially heat over it's entire life.

This is one reason I LOVE the I4 Ecotec engine in the 'Nox. It heats up very quickly to operating temp.
 
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