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A catch can might do you some good with respect to the gunk in the line.

Do you do a lot of in town or short trips? In cold damp weather condensation will build up, if you don't drive long enough to fully heat the engine. At least once a week you should get it out on the interstate and let it cruse at speed for 10 miles or so. That will heat the oil in the pan and evaporate water that has built up.

You don't say your odometer reading but 1,500 per quart, while not optimal, is not terrible. I don't think GM will do anything at this point but you might want to get it "on the books".

That was the good news. The bad news (as I'm sure you already know) is that it your oil consumption won't get better. Keep your eye on your oil level and use high quality oil.

Lots of luck!

I forgot to mention that in cold weather that gunk can freeze. If that happens the PCV system may cause the block to pressurize (due to blow-by pressure). If that happens the crankshaft seals can blow out and suddenly you will have no oil and a huge repair bill.
 

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My Terrain has been burning oil i assume, have to put in a quart about every 1500 miles.

this morning i went to check oil and pulled the oil fill cap.

i pulled the hose and cleaned it out, poured out all the brown goop from the airbox section where it connects.



To remedy the possibility of a blown main seal, you light try one of these.
It won't do anything for oil consumption, but it will relieve crank case pressure.
There are other "oil breathers" as well. . so shop around. ZZP and some others.



https://www.ebay.com/itm/Billet-Alu...e=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649
 

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Not really. These heaters are often stuck to the oil pan and are good for getting the oil "warm" in engines that use high viscosity oil like a diesel. At 150 watts it will only put out a little over 500 BTUs of heat.

I've seen these used a lot on farm equipment and big trucks. Those engines are diesel powered and as such typically use something like 15W-40 oil. When it gets really cold that weight oil is super thick and doesn't want to circulate properly, so one of these heaters (maybe) coupled with a block heater is really useful.

Gasoline engines (with heaters) normally have a freeze plug style heater. They are rated at 400-600 watts and are designed to warm the water inside the block.

The main advantages of a block heater is that it allows the engine to get up to temp quicker and since the starter is not dragging all that cold metal around will ease the amperage load on the battery when cranking.

Since most Equinoxes are using 5W-30 synthetic (or a blend) lube, the sluggish oil issue isn't a problem.

Oil temperatures of a fully warmed engine tend to run about 10 degrees warmer than the thermostat so it should be around 205 degrees.

The problem with oil temperature is that it takes a LOT longer for the oil to get hot (compared to the coolant). That is why you need to drive it about 30 minutes at speed. Get it hot and keep it hot. That will evaporate the water.
 

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A radiator hose heater is the method I have used on many vehicles, if you park outside. Easy, drain the coolant, cut the low radiator hose, insert, clamp, and then route the electical plug out the front of your grill and secure with tie straps. Refill your coolant tank.

The GM Oil Consumption is more than 1 qt every 2k miles, so you would qualify. The work also includes new timing chains and guides.

A catch can will prevent your air box and line from building up and freezing, and the block heater will keep your coolant warm and may prevent the orrifice in the head from freezing.
 

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A catch can will prevent your air box and line from building up and freezing, and the block heater will keep your coolant warm and may prevent the orrifice in the head from freezing.
An oil catch on the 2.4L can will do little to nothing to prevent PCV freezing or clogging. That is misinformation.

Also, idling the 2.4L longer to "clear the line" and PCV orifice in cold weather will not do enough to eliminate any significant amount of moisture in the PCV path. Crankcase water vapor builds up in cold or humid weather. Only long extended periods of engine operation and heat from it will burn off excessive crankcase water vapor build up.


A heater may help , but one real problem is a low spot in the fresh air tube going to the air plenum. Correcting that low spot in the fresh air tube by replacing it also may remedy a large part of crankcase condensates from clogging that line. To be honest, the PCV in the 2.4L is a poor design in and very cold weather a vented oil breather cap has been found to be more effective if the PCV or intake tube does get clogged with gummy oil or frozen.
https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-eng...cum-pressure-rear-main-seal-2.html#post274269


https://www.equinoxforum.net/10-gen...resting-find-crankcase-vent-5.html#post219273
 

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An oil catch on the 2.4L can will do little to nothing to prevent PCV freezing or clogging. That is misinformation.

Also, idling the 2.4L longer to "clear the line" and PCV orifice in cold weather will not do enough to eliminate any significant amount of moisture in the PCV path. Crankcase water vapor builds up in cold or humid weather. Only long extended periods of engine operation and heat from it will burn off excessive crankcase water vapor build up.


A heater may help , but one real problem is a low spot in the fresh air tube going to the air plenum. Correcting that low spot in the fresh air tube by replacing it also may remedy a large part of crankcase condensates from clogging that line. To be honest, the PCV in the 2.4L is a poor design in and very cold weather a vented oil breather cap has been found to be more effective if the PCV or intake tube does get clogged with gummy oil or frozen.
https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-eng...cum-pressure-rear-main-seal-2.html#post274269


https://www.equinoxforum.net/10-gen...resting-find-crankcase-vent-5.html#post219273
This is not disinformation. The catch can will eliminate the poorly designed downward sloping of the tube toward the reservoir in the air intake. It collects the oil and water before it makes its way to the reservoir which is also poorly design with the input near the bottom instead of the top. The catch can has the input on the top and output also on the top, thus the reason they call it a catch can. All the driving in the world will not eliminate the build-up in the stock reservoir. The water will freeze in the catch can but it will not block venting of the crankcase, unless it also becomes filled.

The crankcase vents through the intake oriffice, through the fresh air intake from the valve cover and as a last resort through vent holes in the seals themselves. If the both the intake and fresh are are frozen shut the chances of the seals being dislodged is likely.

For those who are contemplating putting in a vented fill cap. Don't do it. It works on older, non EFI engines, but doing so on the Ecotec will cause severe lean conditions. I tried unscrewing the filler cap halfway and saw the fuel trim numbers skyrocket, and excessive fuel injected into the engine to compensate for the non-metered air. It did not cause a misfire or any other noticeable change. A check valve may work but, personally I don't want to experiment on my engine to figure out how much backpressure is needed to open the valve before it compromises the crankshaft seal.

Attached is photo of the simple oil/water separator that I installed on my car. The upper tube and reservoir remains dry and clean, as well as the throttle body. Some owners of ecotec engines have reported throttle body freezing in cold weather as well.
 

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GM has a Service Bulletin SB-10057077-8108 March 2015 covering the PCV issue for those who are concerned. https://gm.oemdtc.com/Recall/SB-10057977-8108.pdf
It officially discusses this and what should be done. Coverage is for 10 years and 120,000 miles on vehicles specified. There may also be an updated Bulletin so need to check for latest. https://gm.oemdtc.com/1899/special-...intake-manifold-2010-2014-buick-chevrolet-gmc
For those interested in using a vented Oil Cap with check valve,
https://www.c-f-m.com/performancepa...o-SS-ZL1-LSA-LSx-LS1-5-7-LS3-6-2L-766p212.htm
This breather is the ONLY one in the market which incorporates a check ball to keep unmetered air from coming through while the crankcase is under vacuum.
This is used on the Camaro and does NOT cause lean fuel trims like simply removing the oil cap.
it should not cause any issue with fuel trims because air flow is allowed only out of the crankcase (not into) under any condition where the PCV path may become clogged. This will prevent blowing out rear engine main seals.

A small external catch can carries the danger of becoming full and or also becoming clogged with frozen condensates.

Also, we have seen no evidence of any small hole in engine oil seals that will "let excess pressure out". More likely, under excess crankcase pressure, air would be forced out around the main seal. It is designed with a accordion like bellowed lip which would allow pressure to escape up to a point. But it would also likely damage it and begin to allow crank oil flow out of the engine.
Link to another recent discussion on this - - : https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-eng...n-ring-replacement-progress-2.html#post274909

There is even a GM Service Bulletin covering it . . https://gm.oemdtc.com/1899/special-c...-chevrolet-gmc
In part it reads - - -
*-
Copyright 2015
General Motors. All Rights Reserved.
Service Bulletin
Bulletin No.: Date: 1 4882
March 2015
SPECIAL COVERAGE
SUBJECT:
Special Coverage Adjustment

Plugged PCV Orifice in Intake Manifold

2013 GMC Terrain vehicles equipped with a 2.4L engine

(LAF, LEA or LUK) that have experienced high oil consumption may also experience a frozen and/or plugged
PCV(positive crankcase ventilation) system during cold weather operation. This condition may increase crankcase pressure leading to a rear crankshaft seal oil leak.
If the oil leak is ignored or not noticed, an engine clatter noise may be noticeable and/or the engine pressure warning light may illuminate.
If this condition is not corrected, continued driving with engine
noise and/or the engine oil pressure light illuminated may damage the engine.

 

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You saw lean fuel trims only because all you did was remove the oil filler cap. You did not use a check valve type Oil Filler Cap. Another member here has been using this with no lean fuel trims whatsoever. I pointed this out in earlier threads so again, your statement in the quote below is inaccurate.
For those interested in using a vented Oil Cap with check valve,
https://www.c-f-m.com/performancepa...o-SS-ZL1-LSA-LSx-LS1-5-7-LS3-6-2L-766p212.htm
This breather is the ONLY one in the market which incorporates a check ball to keep unmetered air from coming through while the crankcase is under vacuum.
This is used on the Camaro and does NOT cause lean fuel trims like simply removing the oil cap.

For those who are contemplating putting in a vented fill cap. Don't do it. It works on older, non EFI engines, but doing so on the Ecotec will cause severe lean conditions. I tried unscrewing the filler cap halfway and saw the fuel trim numbers skyrocket, and excessive fuel injected into the engine to compensate for the non-metered air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I called and reported the issue while it was still under warranty
issue is more prevalent now as you can see from the water in the oil.

I have 65k miles and burning a quart of oil every 1500 miles is crazy to me !

if i remove the oil fill cap while running it is blowing air out of the port, i put a nitrile glove over over the hole and it dances like a diaphragm !

i was looking to see if removing the intake manifold to clear the orifice was possible, but looks to be a major undertaking, including dealing with the HVAC system.

i was looking to put an inline oil water separator but need to remove the clog first to be effective.
 

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Wow. . . Agree a quart every 1,500 miles shouldn't be happening.
For the frozen clog. . . the Vented Oil Filler cap below HAS a check valve and won't dance all over. The nitrile glove did that because it has no reverse flow prevention like a check valve.
They have been using this breather cap on Camaros for several years with no ill effects. It only allows crankcase pressure out . .. not air flow back in so no danger.

https://www.c-f-m.com/performancepa...o-SS-ZL1-LSA-LSx-LS1-5-7-LS3-6-2L-766p212.htm






I called and reported the issue while it was still under warranty
issue is more prevalent now as you can see from the water in the oil.

I have 65k miles and burning a quart of oil every 1500 miles is crazy to me !

if i remove the oil fill cap while running it is blowing air out of the port, i put a nitrile glove over over the hole and it dances like a diaphragm !

i was looking to see if removing the intake manifold to clear the orifice was possible, but looks to be a major undertaking, including dealing with the HVAC system.

i was looking to put an inline oil water separator but need to remove the clog first to be effective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Cool Breather Cap, will it fit directly on the Terrain with out mods ? same Thread pattern for the cap as stock, remove and place this one in.

or something special required ??
 

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Cool Breather Cap, will it fit directly on the Terrain with out mods ? same Thread pattern for the cap as stock, remove and place this one in.

or something special required ??
It fits right in and replaces the stock Oil Cap.
Member adidas6804444 also is using one on his 2014 2.4L. See this posting as well as read earlier in the thread.
https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-eng...cum-pressure-rear-main-seal-2.html#post274269
If you get one, keep your original cap handy in the vehicle in case you need to take it into the dealer for service. The dealer might use it as an excuse to blame your oil consumption on almost anything.



 

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You saw lean fuel trims only because all you did was remove the oil filler cap. You did not use a check valve type Oil Filler Cap. Another member here has been using this with no lean fuel trims whatsoever. I pointed this out in earlier threads so again, your statement in the quote below is inaccurate.
For those interested in using a vented Oil Cap with check valve,
https://www.c-f-m.com/performancepa...o-SS-ZL1-LSA-LSx-LS1-5-7-LS3-6-2L-766p212.htm
This breather is the ONLY one in the market which incorporates a check ball to keep unmetered air from coming through while the crankcase is under vacuum.
This is used on the Camaro and does NOT cause lean fuel trims like simply removing the oil cap.
I have read on this forum and others where people are suggesting just normal breather. As I stated this will work fine for non-EFI engines but will cause lean fuel trims due to the vacuum leak. My comment is indeed accurate.

MEMBER WARNING: The above oil cap with check valve recommended by JayTee2014 is designed for racing applications for a forced air induction (turbo or supercharged) engine, a Chevy LS engine to be precise, that is twice the displacement of the 2.4l Ecotec. Suggest reading the details from the manufacturer. Whether it is this cap or some check valve from a big box store, without quantifiable engine pressure tests simulating a blocked PCV system under normal and severe driving conditions, and matching it with an appropriately designed and tested check valve, you are risking damage to your engine.

My recommendation is to regularly test your PCV orifice with a vacuum gauge as outline in the 14482: Special Coverage and using a transparent oil/water separator to prevent blockage. These separators are not designed to be installed and forgotten, but must be checked regularly, preferable at each fill-up while you are checking oil level. Even the smallest separator is several times larger in capacity than the stock reservoir in the Equinox.
 

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I have read on this forum and others where people are suggesting just normal breather. As I stated this will work fine for non-EFI engines but will cause lean fuel trims due to the vacuum leak. My comment is indeed accurate.

Whether it is this cap or some check valve from a big box store, without quantifiable engine pressure tests simulating a blocked PCV system under normal and severe driving conditions, and matching it with an appropriately designed and tested check valve, you are risking damage to your engine.
Well, respectfully, I think we just will have to agree to disagree.
Interesting rebuttal. We're not talking about a "normal Oil Breather" here. . We are talking about the check valved version. However, your assertions are easily checked to be false. Simply connect an ODBII scanner to check fuel trims (as you claim you did in an earlier post) before and after installing a check valved Oil Breather as some have already done. Since there is a check valve, no air can flow into the (or backwards) into the crankcase to cause any alleged lean condition or changed fuel trims.

Also, again, you throw fear into peoples minds implying that the *CFM Performance Billet Valve Cover Breather* should only be used in "racing engines". . which also are "EFI" like the 2.4L. From their website - : "Although this kit was designed for use in racing applications, it works and looks great on any engine compartment." Plus, the size of the engine , big block or otherwise, has nothing to do with the function that the check valved oil breather will provide on the 2.4L engine.


Again. . . connecting an ODBII scanner with the CFM Performance Billet Valve Cover Breather installed will show no cause of any damage or ill affects to the 2.4L engine. The product is well designed, cleanable, and well made. There is no danger in using it verses a small oil separator that needs to be checked regularly and drained. That is a real potential added problem.
There is danger of forgetting that the oil separator, such as sydnesb suggests, and the separator becomes filled to the brim or contents frozen in cold whether thus blocking the original unmodified 2.4L GM designed clean air tube to the air intake. That, would create a dangerous pressurized crankcase condition and likely cause the main seals to blow which is what a check valved Oil Breather would easily prevent.
In short, installing a checked valved Oil Breather carries no risk in changing PCV function whereas, cutting, installing and having to regularly check a jerry rigged oil separator cut into the factory OEM PCV path with potential compromise does.

In addtion, yes, especially in cold weather, checking and cleaning the intake PCV Air Tube on the 2.4L would be a good maintenance strategy. Along with oil changes and checking for any yellow oil/water deposits inside the tube and air plenum on top of the engine.
 

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I thought I would share just to help. No opinion or taking sides...just what I found doing research on this issue.

This issue is not new to GM and there are TSBs going back to at least 2004 for other GM engines suffering blocked/flozen PCV valves.

Quote "Use a new vented oil fill cap, P/N 12589430. A vented oil fill cap will regulate the crankcase pressure between 15 kPa and 18 kPa. This will prevent the over pressurization of the crankcase under the freezing conditions of the PCV system. Once the PCV system thaws out, the crankcase gases will pass through the PCV system and normal crankcase pressure will be restored." http://www.cadillacfaq.com/faq/tsb/data/05-06-01-014.pdf

Search on this part number/vented oil cap and you will see that multiple owners/engines have used successfully. The pressure will vent at 2-2.6 psi. No argument on whether it's a breather or if it has a check valve...it's a GM approved part. And I have confirmed it is a match to our oil cap pattern. It fits.
 

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Interesting read of the GM bulletin. Why doesn't GM ship their vehicles with the vented oil cap in the first place? Because of emission testing? I would rather allow gas to exit the engine rather than blowing an oil seal to allow oil to drip all over the road or allowing an engine to burn a quart of oil into the atmosphere every 1500 miles or less.
 
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I thought I would share just to help. No opinion or taking sides...just what I found doing research on this issue.

This issue is not new to GM and there are TSBs going back to at least 2004 for other GM engines suffering blocked/flozen PCV valves.

Quote "Use a new vented oil fill cap, P/N 12589430. A vented oil fill cap will regulate the crankcase pressure between 15 kPa and 18 kPa. This will prevent the over pressurization of the crankcase under the freezing conditions of the PCV system. Once the PCV system thaws out, the crankcase gases will pass through the PCV system and normal crankcase pressure will be restored." http://www.cadillacfaq.com/faq/tsb/data/05-06-01-014.pdf

Search on this part number/vented oil cap and you will see that multiple owners/engines have used successfully. The pressure will vent at 2-2.6 psi. No argument on whether it's a breather or if it has a check valve...it's a GM approved part. And I have confirmed it is a match to our oil cap pattern. It fits.

Thank you for this info regarding the pdf and vented GM oil cap. In trying to verify fit for 2010 to 2017 GM 2.4L GDI engines, I'm not seeing a match for it to fit. I see 2 or 3 different oil caps listed with this GM 12589430 part number. One had a screw on type thread and others had a slotted bayonet type similar to the engines Equinox/Terrain 2.4L use, but can't really tell.
Could you provide a link and maybe picture of the actual oil cap you purchased and verify it is installed on a 2.4L Ecotech Direct Injection 2010 to 2017 engine?
More on the PCV block, freeze and blown main seal - - - https://www.equinoxforum.net/18-faq...pcv-valve-causing-rear-main-seal-failure.html


Thanks for providing a genuine GM item that would give owners some peace of mind with a genuine GM product.

A 2.18 to 2.61 PSI release pressure would indeed seem to do the job.


It also seems to go by an AC/Delco part # FC219?




It visually . . appears the one below will fit.

********************
 
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