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85k miles know about the recall. Ounce of oil found, pulled plugs and they were black and there is a hollow sound in the engine at idle. Oil consumption qt. in 2k. Have always used mobil1 5-7k changes. Should i take in now?
 

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Root cause of burning oil is LSPI, not oil in air box.
and yes, why not bring it in and have the oil consumption test performed.

If you want to eliminate the oil in the air box (air cleaner and flex)
Then you would install the $80 c-f-m oil cap with nylon ball check valve.
It would keep crankcase pressure at zero psi ( or negative) thus preventing crankcase vapor gunk from backing up through your clean side PCV breather hose, and into air box.

Root cause of oil backup into air box is high crankcase pressure under wide open throttle and
the bad design of the "nylon 6/6 plastic" dirty side PCV orifice
The 80 thousands of an inch inner diameter orifice is easily blocked, by crankcase vapor gunk and cold engine oil which "sticks" to the inside of plastic orifice, plugging up,the orifice ....thus reducing air flow of crankcase pressure out of crankcase.
.....and don't bother cleaning that orifice with a 1/16 th of an inch drill bit, since the orifice is plugged you will get less carbon build up on intake valves.

Also, for folks that live in an area where it gets cold, they would not get crankshaft rear main seal failure with the vented oil cap.



LSPI
From engine builder magazine ===>
"What happens under this low speed, high load situation
is you get bits of carbon and soot that break off from the (intake) valves (and fall into combustion chamber)
and in the combustion chamber ( the carbon bits) makes its way to the cylinder walls where it sticks to the oil and the fuel that’s on the cylinder walls.
When the piston moves up it loads the crevice clearance (on piston ring) with carbon, and those little groupings of carbon and soot get diluted with fuel and oil which then smolder and act like a glow plug or a wick to cause pre-ignition"

https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2017/10/solving-gasoline-direct-injection-issues-facts-fictions-gdi/

This ^^ pre ignition wears away ( erodes) the steel of the piston, in piston ring grooves area,
thus eventually resulting in an oil leak path via piston ring grooves
and voila , oil consumption
My 2 vents^^^
 

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What is your take on the new oils that are supposed to reduce LSPI?
 

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Root cause of burning oil is LSPI, not oil in air box.
and yes, why not bring it in and have the oil consumption test performed.

If you want to eliminate the oil in the air box (air cleaner and flex)
Then you would install the $80 c-f-m oil cap with nylon ball check valve.
It would keep crankcase pressure at zero psi ( or negative) thus preventing crankcase vapor gunk from backing up through your clean side PCV breather hose, and into air box.

Root cause of oil backup into air box is high crankcase pressure under wide open throttle and
the bad design of the "nylon 6/6 plastic" dirty side PCV orifice
The 80 thousands of an inch inner diameter orifice is easily blocked, by crankcase vapor gunk and cold engine oil which "sticks" to the inside of plastic orifice, plugging up,the orifice ....thus reducing air flow of crankcase pressure out of crankcase.
.....and don't bother cleaning that orifice with a 1/16 th of an inch drill bit, since the orifice is plugged you will get less carbon build up on intake valves.

Also, for folks that live in an area where it gets cold, they would not get crankshaft rear main seal failure with the vented oil cap.



LSPI
From engine builder magazine ===>
"What happens under this low speed, high load situation
is you get bits of carbon and soot that break off from the (intake) valves (and fall into combustion chamber)
and in the combustion chamber ( the carbon bits) makes its way to the cylinder walls where it sticks to the oil and the fuel that’s on the cylinder walls.
When the piston moves up it loads the crevice clearance (on piston ring) with carbon, and those little groupings of carbon and soot get diluted with fuel and oil which then smolder and act like a glow plug or a wick to cause pre-ignition"

https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2017/10/solving-gasoline-direct-injection-issues-facts-fictions-gdi/

This ^^ pre ignition wears away ( erodes) the steel of the piston, in piston ring grooves area,
thus eventually resulting in an oil leak path via piston ring grooves
and voila , oil consumption
My 2 vents^^^
The root cause of oil consumption in these engines is due to wrong ring and piston installation at the factory and fuel dilution of the oil in the crankcase. LSPI issue is low on the list for these naturally aspirated engines. LSPI is a problem for boosted engines such as turbo charged and supercharged engines where VE is often above 100%. Naturally aspirated engines are typically around 80% at best for volumetric efficiency. Matt Dickmeyer specifically mentions boosted engines.

Fuel dilution in the oil, extended oil drains, causes viscosity to breakdown, combustion by products to increase, and oil to degrade, and when coupled with the PCV system, this compromised oil is subject to higher amounts of burning in the cylinder. I have over 500 oil analysis results comparing GDI and non-GDI Ecotec engines. Wear rates are double that in GDI due to much higher fuel dilution. Fuel dilution levels can reach in excess of 5% within 2k miles in these engines so oil analysis is a must.

The CFM vented cap only makes the problem with combustion by-products and formation of acids that degrade oil worse by not allow it to escape into the reservoir, instead it remains in the engine. CFM has done no testing at all with this cap in these engines and specifically and formally has stated not to use this cap unless the engine and the cap is at full operating temps.

"Root cause of oil backup into air box is high crankcase pressure under wide open throttle". What evidence do you have that there is pressure in the crankcase at wide open throttle? I have done actual crankcase pressure tests at WOT. I don't think you really understand how this PCV system works.

"The 80 thousands of an inch inner diameter orifice is easily blocked, by crankcase vapor gunk and cold engine oil which "sticks" to the inside of plastic orifice, plugging up,the orifice ....thus reducing air flow of crankcase pressure out of crankcase."

I have examined the valve cover and opening in the head several times over the past year and have not found any "gunk". The typical moisture and little bit of oi that makes through multiple baffles is insignificant, and drawn out of the orifice. Over long periods of time, poor maintenance, use of cheap oil, carbon will build-up and plug the orifice. I have yet to see emulsified oil or 'gunk" build up near the orifice.

".....and don't bother cleaning that orifice with a 1/16 th of an inch drill bit, since the orifice is plugged you will get less carbon build up on intake valves."

This is very foolish advice! If your engine fails the very simple vacuum test on the PCV sytem, owners need to get this corrected as soon as possible. Next I assume you will be telling people to put a permanent plug in the orifice. Another example that you do not understand how the PCV system in this car works.
 

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85k miles know about the recall. Ounce of oil found, pulled plugs and they were black and there is a hollow sound in the engine at idle. Oil consumption qt. in 2k. Have always used mobil1 5-7k changes. Should i take in now?
Were the sparkplugs completely black or just around the edge? What color was the insulator? Was it soot or oil contamination. Heavy soot is a sign of excessive rich condition. This can eventually cause problems with the catalytic converter.

It is unusual to see oil in the air cleaner and flex tube. Does your car have the external air injection connection at the air filter housing?

I would take it in for an oil consumption test at the dealer.

With these GDI engines and fuel contamination, I would advise not to go past 3k miles, unless you do an oil analysis.
 

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Sydnesb,

Dickmeyer Specifically cites the 2.4 liter equinox engine in his article .,,,,
Quotes from his article are below....
Notice his references to both Equinox and its EcoTek 2.4 liter GDI engine


"An issue known as Low Speed Pre-Ignition
(LSPI)
typically occurs in vehicles with GDI engines. Detonation typically occurs in two areas
– in and around the vicinity of the sparkplug, or at the perimeter of the cylinder in the crevice clearance above the top ring between the cylinder and the crown of the piston."

"Dickmeyer had to go through much, much more than a swab or an additive to solve the build up issue with the Chevy Equinox."


"In fact, Matt actually had a customer bring in a low-miles
Chevy Equinox
with engine failure due to this build up. The customer gave Dickmeyer the go ahead to re-engineer and tackle the issues. While there was nothing Matt could do to change the issue from happening due to GDI, there were things he could do to try to allow the engine to operate better in the GDI environment.

“I got a lot of experience and spent seven months to get it right,”
he says.
“The Equinox
was incorrectly diagnosed by a GM dealer as needing a fuel pump. It had a really bad rich condition and a lean condition and so on. I ripped the head off of it and put it on the flow bench and at just a half-inch lift it flowed almost half what a clean port did. The PCM cannot make up for that loss of airflow, so you’ll have a really bad rich condition.”


According to Dickmeyer, when you look at how some of these GDI engines are designed it’s almost like the crankcase ventilation system was an afterthought.
“On the EcoTec GM 2.4L engine,
the inlet where the plastic intake manifold meets the heads for the crankcase ventilation system is down in a low spot that you would normally see an oil drain back passage through,”
Dickmeyer says.
“So you get oil that as it works its way through the engine and comes up to the top end and then works its way back down and falls to these low spots. That’s where a lot of these engines have the vacuum source for the crankcase ventilation system, so they’re sucking in oil.
This issue causes droplets of oil to run through the intake manifold, the intake port, and in the combustion space, which can lead to pre-ignition as well.


https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2017/10/solving-gasoline-direct-injection-issues-facts-fictions-gdi/
 

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Rednox301,

I don't know how the oils that reduce LSPI work but they probably do help reduce LSPI somehow...
The 100% synthetic oils " evaporate" less easily the non-synthetic oils,
so synthetic oils are less likely to end up on intake valves via the PCV system.

I use penzoil platinum 100% synthetic and change oil every 5000 miles, or 35 percent on the oil life monitor system .....

I am using shell premium gasoline,
which is also supposed to reduce LSPI, but the mechanism is "dissolving" the carbon that collects on piston rings and
Less "engine knock" caused by LSPI because it is higher octane

I don't get any better mileage from shell premium on my 4 cylinder equinox's,
and it is an extra $10 per tank of gas,
But I believe it reduces LSPI so it is worth it....
Who knows?
 

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Sydnesb,

Dickmeyer Specifically cites the 2.4 liter equinox engine in his article .,,,,
Quotes from his article are below....
Notice his references to both Equinox and its EcoTek 2.4 liter GDI engine


"An issue known as Low Speed Pre-Ignition
(LSPI)
typically occurs in vehicles with GDI engines.
"Dickmeyer had to go through much, much more than a swab or an additive to solve the build up issue with the Chevy Equinox."


"In fact, Matt actually had a customer bring in a low-miles
Chevy Equinox
with engine failure due to this build up. The customer gave Dickmeyer the go ahead to re-engineer and tackle the issues. While there was nothing Matt could do to change the issue from happening due to GDI, there were things he could do to try to allow the engine to operate better in the GDI environment.

“I got a lot of experience and spent seven months to get it right,”
he says.
“The Equinox
was incorrectly diagnosed by a GM dealer as needing a fuel pump. It had a really bad rich condition and a lean condition and so on. I ripped the head off of it and put it on the flow bench and at just a half-inch lift it flowed almost half what a clean port did. The PCM cannot make up for that loss of airflow, so you’ll have a really bad rich condition.”


According to Dickmeyer, when you look at how some of these GDI engines are designed it’s almost like the crankcase ventilation system was an afterthought.
“On the EcoTec GM 2.4L engine,
the inlet where the plastic intake manifold meets the heads for the crankcase ventilation system is down in a low spot that you would normally see an oil drain back passage through,”
Dickmeyer says.
“So you get oil that as it works its way through the engine and comes up to the top end and then works its way back down and falls to these low spots. That’s where a lot of these engines have the vacuum source for the crankcase ventilation system, so they’re sucking in oil.
This issue causes droplets of oil to run through the intake manifold, the intake port, and in the combustion space, which can lead to pre-ignition as well.


https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2017/10/solving-gasoline-direct-injection-issues-facts-fictions-gdi/
Of course he mentioned the GM 2.4 Ecotec, that was the purpose of the article and what he did to eleviate issues with carbon build-up on the valves due to GDI engines.

I posted and shared this article a year ago, and have exchanged emails with Matt Dickmeyer and spoke extensively on this issue and solution for over an hour.

LPSI is not a major problem with these naturally aspirated engines, compared with supercharged and turbo charged GDI engines.

For those who may not know the pathway for the PCV system, it is not as open and free flowing as some may think. Matt Dickmeyer did not make any changes or examine the internal baffles of the camshaft cover. He did add an oil/air separator to the design.

PCV Routing - crankcase vapors are routed through multiple large passages through the block and head. Prior to reaching the open camshaft area, crankcase gases are routed through two baffles. When gases are drawn in from the intake via vacuum, the same gases are routed through two more baffles at the highest point in the cover, but much lower than crankcase vent to the fresh air intake. Moisture and heat will rise to the highest point. Once it passes through the fourth baffle, it flows down the casting in the head, pass into the intake mating surface area, and travel back up another inch to reach the orifice. From the orifice it is routed to small orifice in the intake runners. Pictures and diagrams were provided by Jasper Engines of these passages. Finally, under wide open throttle and partial throttle, gases pass out of the camshaft cover fitting, but first goes through two more baffles, and then captured in the reservoir in the air intake manifold. This is the highest point in the PCV system. I have posted links to pictures of the all the baffles and routing to this forum.

To date, I have seen no images or videos, and have spoken to GM service techs and they have not reported "gunk" emulsified oil in and around the intake orifice. The 'Gunk" is seen primarily in the fresh air side tube and resevoir and smaller amounts at the fill cap. All PCV systems draw in small amounts of oil mist and moisture, which contributes to carbon build up on valves in GDI engines. The small orifice in the intake has little effect on air flow through the system when operating at other than idle. It was design primarily for idle conditions, when vacuum is highest.

Based on both intake manifold, fresh air intake, and crankcase vacuum measurements under various driving conditions, there is vacuum in the crankcase the majority of the time. The exception is at highway speeds, low to moderate loads, in overdrive. The highest crankcase vacuum was recorded at Wide Open Throttle and then at idle. Unlike traditional PCV system and vacuum controlled valves, fixed orifice systems are used to both feed fresh, metered air to the orifice at idle as well as draw gases from the crankcase through the fresh side, through the throttle body during other engine loads and speeds. In this system the majority of gases and by-products are captured in the intake reservoir (separator) and tube.

The use of a vented cap like CFM performance, which has no testing, or pubished data, and which vents at the slightest pressure, will interfere with the the normal flow of gases and by-products through the fresh air side and will not be captured by the reservoir, and remain in the engine and cam shaft cover, thereby creating more acids and degradation of the oil. Anyone who has installed a fresh air side separator knows how much harmful gases, moisture and sludge is removed from the engine.

The problem is that GM or independents do not advise owners to check and clean this resevoir on a regular basis as part of routine maintenance, especially during cold weather. In addition the stock tube does not allow draining of moisture and oil back to the crankcase and traps it in the bottom of the resevoir, where it freezes. I have posted pictures and description of installing a drain on the resevior that does not require removal of the air intake. I have also posted a description and pictures of cleanside air/oil separator that can be easily inspected and cleaned.
 

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Rednox301,

I don't know how the oils that reduce LSPI work but they probably do help reduce LSPI somehow...
The 100% synthetic oils " evaporate" less easily the non-synthetic oils,
so synthetic oils are less likely to end up on intake valves via the PCV system.

I use penzoil platinum 100% synthetic and change oil every 5000 miles, or 35 percent on the oil life monitor system .....

I am using shell premium gasoline,
which is also supposed to reduce LSPI, but the mechanism is "dissolving" the carbon that collects on piston rings and
Less "engine knock" caused by LSPI because it is higher octane

I don't get any better mileage from shell premium on my 4 cylinder equinox's,
and it is an extra $10 per tank of gas,
But I believe it reduces LSPI so it is worth it....
Who knows?
I would agree to using Top Tier Fuels will help with the carbon build-up in the combustion chamber and indirectly to the intake valves.

Use of 100% Group IV fully synthetic oil, with low volatility specs, meeting SN+ requirements will definately help reduce carbon build up in the combustion chamber, valves and the PCV orifice.

Penzoil Platinum is petroluem (dino) oil, that has been hydro-cracked ( modified by heat and pressure), and because of court hearing they can call it a synthetic, but it is not a 100% fully synthetic oil. Europe Union and their strict requirements do not consider PP a synthetic oil. Use premium fuel and premium oil in your car. Get the oil tested once per oil change and follow the recommendations of the lab doing the tests.

Even with new pistons/rings, factory spec compression and leak down, rebuilt head, injectors cleaned, I am still getting high fuel dilution which results in a max 3k oil change interval.
 

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Sydnesb,
You said ......==> "To date, I have seen no images or videos, and have spoken to GM service techs and they have not reported "gunk" emulsified oil in and around the intake orifice. The 'Gunk" ......"

To which I reply....==>
Record this date on your calendar,
.... here is GM's bulletin about "ice, sludge, water and carbon" in the dirty side PCV orifice,
And
... GM's recommendation on how to clean the dirty side PCV orifice with a 1/16 inch drill bit.

Notice the dirty side PCV orifice is a hole (the hole is about about 80 thousands of an inch in diameter) molded into the black nylon 6/6 plastic intake manifold.

GM's bulletin says.......==>
6. Clean ice, sludge, water, and carbon out of ..... the PCV orifice ............., PCV orifice ..... (use a 1/16 inch drill bit as shown in color photograph) (the black and white drawing shows the clean side breather hose)



https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2015/SB-10090101-2280.pdf
 

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ThreeNox : I installed your fancy PCV $80 oil cap you keep suggesting on my wife’s Equinox. The interior of the car now smells like a truck stop since all of the blow by being released is getting sucked into the fresh air intake and out the vents inside the car. You may reconsider recommending this valve to people.. I’d hate to see someone get sick from carbon monoxide poisoning.
 

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Spartus,
Sorry to hear that, of that "smell" failure mode
The fact it is possible to smell "truck stop blow by" is a good warning sign that something is not right.

Why does your equinox with cfm oil cap, have oil crankcase fumes in passenger compartment? And not others (My 2013 Equinox has no oil smell in cabin, and neither do my other cars, adidas had no oil smell...)

What is different with your situation?
What are the details?
Was it below freezing outside?
How long has the cfm oil cap been on your wife's equinox?

You could adapt the cfm design, say clamp a hose on it, to divert the cfm oil cap venting away and down to the pavement.....away from cabin air intake...
Or ..... try another solution to prevent rear main seal failure.


Most folks don't know about rear main seal failure on winter, and the cfm oil cap. For that reason, it is good to know that there is an off the shelf solution.

Sometimes, unintended consequences do occur in design changes, like when GM went to GDI engines, the unintended consequence is crankshaft rear main seal failure in winter. And then you come up with a design solution...

Last year, My 2013 Equinox with the OEM oil cap had crankcase gunk in clean side PCV hose and in the air box.

https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engine-drivetrain/25827-pcv-oil-breather-vaccum-pressure-rear-main-seal.html

Then, after reading ^^ about the cfm oil cap, I bought the cfm oil cap, and put them on my cars. Even when it was minus 20 F degrees for 3 days and even when it was below minus zero degrees F for weeks.., no issues (no smell) with my 2013 Equinox.
And to date, no more gunk in cleanside PCV breather hoses.
And no rear main seal failure.....
and no oil smell ( in and of my cars)

what is different about your equinox situation, why does your equinox get oil smell?
 

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ThreeNox : I installed your fancy PCV $80 oil cap you keep suggesting on my wife’s Equinox. The interior of the car now smells like a truck stop since all of the blow by being released is getting sucked into the fresh air intake and out the vents inside the car. You may reconsider recommending this valve to people.. I’d hate to see someone get sick from carbon monoxide poisoning.
I also recently installed my CFM cap and have noticed no fumes or smell in cabin. Only problem I had was actually installing it, thing wouldn't fully tighten by hand. Bit of a nightmare to get off in the cold too. So have had to warm engine up before being able to remove it.

Unsure if I prefer CFM or vented gm cap but I guess this one should work better as the gm hole is tiny and hard to check if it becomes blocked.
 

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ThreeNox : I installed your fancy PCV $80 oil cap you keep suggesting on my wife’s Equinox. The interior of the car now smells like a truck stop since all of the blow by being released is getting sucked into the fresh air intake and out the vents inside the car. You may reconsider recommending this valve to people.. I’d hate to see someone get sick from carbon monoxide poisoning.
Spartus, sorry to hear of your experience with this oil cap. I have been telling people this was not designed for our Ecotec engines. The manufacturer does not recommend using it unless the engine and cap is at full operating temps. It has not data on performance of this cap for any application because they have done no testing at all. Furthermore it provides virtually no resistance from the normal pulses of pressure created by the rotating mass. Others have reported the nylon ball venting on a regular basis.

Return the cap to CFM Performance and email Hector at [email protected]

I have completed some basic crankcase and intake pressure/vacuum tests on my properly running 2.4l Ecotec engine. There are situations where there will be positive pressure in the camshaft cover and will vent through this poorly design cap. The OEM design would draw those vapors back into the intake and prevent them from entering the air intake of the cabin filter area.

Now ThreeNox is suggesting there is something seriously wrong with your car and suggesting to use a draft tube design which was abandoned by manufacturers in the 70's.

ThreeNox claims this cap saved his engine, but provides no evidence. Subzero temps and build-up in the air intake does not mean your rear seal will fail. The lack of rear seal failure does NOT prove performance of this cap.

Test your PCV orifice as soon as possible. With the engine running, remove your plastic tube, use a golf tee or similar device and plug the tube fitting leading back to the camshaft cover. This will create a vacuum in the crankcase. You will hear a whistle sound from the back of the engine.
Remove your dipstick and with your finger, feel for vacuum. If the orifice is clear you should have vacuum. Repeat with the engine running at 2k rpm.
 

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I also recently installed my CFM cap and have noticed no fumes or smell in cabin. Only problem I had was actually installing it, thing wouldn't fully tighten by hand. Bit of a nightmare to get off in the cold too. So have had to warm engine up before being able to remove it.

Unsure if I prefer CFM or vented gm cap but I guess this one should work better as the gm hole is tiny and hard to check if it becomes blocked.
CFM said not to use the vented oil cap unless the engine is at full operating temps. They have no testing of this cap in freezing weather, because as they have noted, they are located in Florida.

It is very easy to check the performance of the PCV orifice. See the my other post to the OP.
 

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Spartus,
Sorry to hear that, of that "smell" failure mode
The fact it is possible to smell "truck stop blow by" is a good warning sign that something is not right.

Why does your equinox with cfm oil cap, have oil crankcase fumes in passenger compartment? And not others (My 2013 Equinox has no oil smell in cabin, and neither do my other cars, adidas had no oil smell...)

What is different with your situation?
What are the details?
Was it below freezing outside?
How long has the cfm oil cap been on your wife's equinox?

You could adapt the cfm design, say clamp a hose on it, to divert the cfm oil cap venting away and down to the pavement.....away from cabin air intake...
Or ..... try another solution to prevent rear main seal failure.


Most folks don't know about rear main seal failure on winter, and the cfm oil cap. For that reason, it is good to know that there is an off the shelf solution.

Sometimes, unintended consequences do occur in design changes, like when GM went to GDI engines, the unintended consequence is crankshaft rear main seal failure in winter. And then you come up with a design solution...

Last year, My 2013 Equinox with the OEM oil cap had crankcase gunk in clean side PCV hose and in the air box.

https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engine-drivetrain/25827-pcv-oil-breather-vaccum-pressure-rear-main-seal.html

Then, after reading ^^ about the cfm oil cap, I bought the cfm oil cap, and put them on my cars. Even when it was minus 20 F degrees for 3 days and even when it was below minus zero degrees F for weeks.., no issues (no smell) with my 2013 Equinox.
And to date, no more gunk in cleanside PCV breather hoses.
And no rear main seal failure.....
and no oil smell ( in and of my cars)

what is different about your equinox situation, why does your equinox get oil smell?
There are unintended consequences of using this vented cap, frequent venting of combustion gases, by-products remain in the engine, freezing cap as others have reported, oil and moisture coating your engine compartment, and now reports of fuel/oil smells being drawn into cabin.

Your testimonial is merely an opinion, based on no evidence. My Nox experienced the same freezing temps, moisture/oil build-up in the fresh air side, and it did not cause my rear seal failure. The lack of failure is not proof of performance.

Seeing that you want to be the unoffficial spokesperson for CFM Performance, why don't you post all the performance testing they did on this cap, and with this Ecotec engine to include crankcase and intake pressure measurements and the performance aspects of the cap.
 

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Sydnesb,
You said ......==> "To date, I have seen no images or videos, and have spoken to GM service techs and they have not reported "gunk" emulsified oil in and around the intake orifice. The 'Gunk" ......"

To which I reply....==>
Record this date on your calendar,
.... here is GM's bulletin about "ice, sludge, water and carbon" in the dirty side PCV orifice,
And
... GM's recommendation on how to clean the dirty side PCV orifice with a 1/16 inch drill bit.

Notice the dirty side PCV orifice is a hole (the hole is about about 80 thousands of an inch in diameter) molded into the black nylon 6/6 plastic intake manifold.

GM's bulletin says.......==>
6. Clean ice, sludge, water, and carbon out of ..... the PCV orifice ............., PCV orifice ..... (use a 1/16 inch drill bit as shown in color photograph) (the black and white drawing shows the clean side breather hose)



https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/tsbs/2015/SB-10090101-2280.pdf
My local GM techs have never found ice, sludge and water in the orifice. The only thing they have found is solid carbon. This takes years to build-up. The above referenced TSB is refering to the cleanside which includes the camshaft cover fitting, hose and reservoir, where ice, water and sludge forms.

Suggest you use a little common sense.
 

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ThreeNox : I installed your fancy PCV $80 oil cap you keep suggesting on my wife’s Equinox.
The interior of the car now smells like a truck stop since all of the blow by being released is getting sucked into the fresh air intake and out the vents inside the car.

My 2 cents....
at IDLE the cfm oil cap does vent into engine compartment on my 2.4 liter equinox's, that reflects on how poor this PCV system is....
on my V6 equinox, with the cfm oil cap, AT IDLE, crankcase does not vent into engine compartment, the cfm check valve is sucked shut by crankcase vacuum, the v6 has a properly designed pvc system


The fresh air intake into passenger compartment is via a pathway, OUTSIDE of engine compartment
And is located below your wiper blades, on passenger side.
That fresh air intake is OUTSIDE of your engine compartment
and
is separated from your engine compartment by a rubber seal that runs the length of your hood.


If you open your hood, you can see the rubber seal that seals against the hood when hood is closed (see picture below)
and the rubber seal separates the engine compartment air from the fresh air intakes by the wipers.


... I can only speculate....
... how it might be possible for engine compartment air to enters the fresh air intake vent ==>


Two possible failure modes to get engine compartment air into car are:
1 The gasket that seals the engine compartment from fresh air vent is damaged, missing or not functioning as intended, so that engine compartment air gets past the gasket and is sucked in to fresh air intake


2 A layer of snow or ice, covered the area at the base of the wiper, preventing external air from entering into fresh air intake.
IF Fresh external air can not enter the fresh air vent, since the external pathway is plugged with snow and ice
.... like a blanket of snow covers windshield, wipers and hood....
.... Then instead of pulling in fresh external air, then air might be sucked in from engine compartment ... air that has leaked past the gasket that is supposed to seal between the fresh air intake and engine compartment.


One of those 2 is my guess, ^^
Snow covered your fresh air intake....
Then you engine compartment air was sucked past the seal between engine compartment and fresh air intake.




I will continue using the cfm oil cap, its benefits of keeping crankcase at low pressure by venting crankcase gasses
will contribute to longer engine life,, no oil in clean air side of PCV by air filter,
in addition to preventing crankshaft rear main seal failure.
Those benefits ^^ out weigh the risk of "oily smell"
of this poorly designed PCV system.
AND
I believe the risk of oil smell could be resolved by adding "ducting" to move venting to ground level....further away from fresh air intake.
I just removed the decorative cfm oil cap filter
And added a "radiator hose" which ducts the crankcase gas to street level in left front corner of equinox ( see picture below)


It is as if this radiator hose was made for the cfm oil cap and equinox
https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/carquest-by-dayco-curved-radiator-hose-e71854/19590465-P
 

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I have a 2011,2.4,bought used,134 thousand,moisture in cap,and on dipstick,also engine chatter,in short I pulled the head,replaced balance shaft and timing chains,cleaned air intake and enlarged hole in intake per instructions in overhaul kit,new valves,the special valve removal tool was 18 bucks,rings,headset,,my pistons took the 2.0 mm ring set,wished I would have got the new pistons for 80 bucks as they have 2.5 mm oil control rings,chain kit,h Ave 750 bucks in new parts including hi pressure fuel pump and new water pump,took me a week to do it,it can be done in frame easily,dont be afraid,fairly good set metric tools,roadraceengineering.com has a free download for 2.4 engine overhaul,just turned 5k and running good
 

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my pistons took the 2.0 mm ring set,wished I would have got the new pistons for 80 bucks as they have 2.5 mm oil control rings,d


well done bunkmonky, that's a lot of work.

could you explain in detail
your observations of the difference between the old and new pistons.
what is 2.0 mm ring, vs 2.5 mm,..... is it the thickness of the two compression rings?

did the oil control ring change?
 
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