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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I didnt see it posted anywhere, but it IS possible to remove the headrests
for the rear seats, on the 2010 Equinox. It lets the seat fold down a little
farther, but still not flat. It also gives a better view, out of the rear view
mirror, which is why i have opted to remove mine, as I also seldom have
anyone riding in the rear.

Unlike the front headrests, there is not a button to push to adjust, or release
the rear headrests. But if you look closely, on each of the 2 collars that the
headrest posts go into, there is a small hole on the side. You can use a very
small screwdirver, or anything small enough to fit in the hole, and push in, and
it will release the headrests, but you need to push in on both at the same time.

I used two Allen wrenches (L keys) . The L shape, really helps, as one of the
holes, is facing the other post, and makes it difficult to get anything long into
the hole.
 

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I wonder why GM makes it so relatively hard to remove the rear headrests?

I remember we were looking at the Ford Escape last fall before deciding on the Terrain.
If you wanted the rear seats to fold flat, you had to remove the headrests, but it was a lot easier on the Escape.

Oh well, it is what it is.
Maybe GM felt there was enough cargo space, who knows?

Thanks catfan64 for reminding us it is possible if we really wanted to remove the rear headrests.
 

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Have you tried to put them back in? I was curious if whatever you moved would spring back and not let you put them back in. Just wondering before I take mine off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
GARYD said:
Have you tried to put them back in? I was curious if whatever you moved would spring back and not let you put them back in. Just wondering before I take mine off.
No problem to put them back in. The catch is spring loaded, but the end of the posts are tapered, and slip right back in,
and lock into place, with out tools. Unlike the front headrests, the rear posts do NOT have adjustment notches, that allow
them to be locked at different different positions. They only have one notch, that locks them in, when they are pushed all
the way down. You can put them back in, and if you don't push them all the way down, they won't lock in place, and you
can remove them again, without tools, but if doesnt take much to cause them to lock back in place. I have been looking
for something, like a thick washer, that will fit around the posts, and will prevent them from being pushed all the way down
into the locking position. That way, you can put them back in, and they won't lock, and can be removed with out tools.
1/4" would definitely be enough, and possibly even 1/8".

Just a hint on removing them the first time. Because they are so close to the top of the seat, when you are slipping your hand
between the headrest and the seat, it will apply upwards pressure on the headrest, and make it difficult to get the catches
to release. Just make sure, that when you have your 2 tools inserted in the holes, that you are not forcing the headrest up,
untill after you push in on the releases.
 

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catfan64 said:
No problem to put them back in. The catch is spring loaded, but the end of the posts are tapered, and slip right back in,
and lock into place, with out tools. Unlike the front headrests, the rear posts do NOT have adjustment notches, that allow
them to be locked at different different positions. They only have one notch, that locks them in, when they are pushed all
the way down. You can put them back in, and if you don't push them all the way down, they won't lock in place, and you
can remove them again, without tools, but if doesnt take much to cause them to lock back in place. I have been looking
for something, like a thick washer, that will fit around the posts, and will prevent them from being pushed all the way down
into the locking position. That way, you can put them back in, and they won't lock, and can be removed with out tools.
1/4" would definitely be enough, and possibly even 1/8".

Just a hint on removing them the first time. Because they are so close to the top of the seat, when you are slipping your hand
between the headrest and the seat, it will apply upwards pressure on the headrest, and make it difficult to get the catches to release.

Thanks Catfan64- excellent instructions. I had tried to remove them once before but failed to see both the holes on the posts nearest the center of the car. I used the allen wrenches and finally located BOTH holes on each post. With a little work I was able to press both in at the same time and yank and off it came. Makes a nice difference in room and fit.
Just make sure, that when you have your 2 tools inserted in the holes, that you are not forcing the headrest up,
untill after you push in on the releases.
 

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Thank you so much for finding this trick. I've owned my terrain for 2.5 years and always thought it was odd that the headrests didn't come out. Then I went to put in a new booster seat for my 4 year old daughter and it didn't fit right with the headrest. After reading this it took 30 seconds to pull out with two small allen wrenches.
 

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Maybe some kind of thick (cylindrical) rubber sleeve fit around the post to keep it from re-locking? I presume this piece would be sitting up high on the post (just below the headrest fabric), so you wouldn't want anything very hard that could vibrate and cut a hole through the fabric eventually. Maybe a plumber's supply store could fit something on there for you.

I'm sure you're aware that these "headrests" actually protect against whiplash (neck injury). Removing them removes this protection for any adults sitting in the back seats. That said, I've considered removing mine too because this vehicle has GOT to have the WORST visibility of any vehicle ever produced. Sure, it's probably safer - which is great, but between the thick windshield pillars, the VERY limited side glass, and those rear headrests, you really can't see much of anything. And forget about backing this vehicle up. I was up in MA recently and had to parallel park on the street for 10 straight days. No idea where the back end was and I had to constantly turn the passenger mirror toward the ground to avoid crushing my aluminum wheel against those hard right-angle curbs! Managed to do it, but it wasn't easy. I've also had traffic cops at the kids' schools disappear behind those overly thick windshield pillars. Again, they'll come in handy when the vehicle rolls over, but I'm thinking they could've been made a little thinner...
 
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