Another PCV issue 2013 Terrain - TerrainForum.net: GMC Terrain Forum
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post #1 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-02-2018, 03:01 PM Thread Starter
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Another PCV issue 2013 Terrain

My Terrain has been burning oil i assume, have to put in a quart about every 1500 miles.

this morning i went to check oil and pulled the oil fill cap.

i pulled the hose and cleaned it out, poured out all the brown goop from the airbox section where it connects.
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post #2 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-02-2018, 03:23 PM
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A catch can might do you some good with respect to the gunk in the line.

Do you do a lot of in town or short trips? In cold damp weather condensation will build up, if you don't drive long enough to fully heat the engine. At least once a week you should get it out on the interstate and let it cruse at speed for 10 miles or so. That will heat the oil in the pan and evaporate water that has built up.

You don't say your odometer reading but 1,500 per quart, while not optimal, is not terrible. I don't think GM will do anything at this point but you might want to get it "on the books".

That was the good news. The bad news (as I'm sure you already know) is that it your oil consumption won't get better. Keep your eye on your oil level and use high quality oil.

Lots of luck!

I forgot to mention that in cold weather that gunk can freeze. If that happens the PCV system may cause the block to pressurize (due to blow-by pressure). If that happens the crankshaft seals can blow out and suddenly you will have no oil and a huge repair bill.
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Last edited by spook; 12-02-2018 at 03:32 PM. Reason: Adding a thought.
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post #3 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-02-2018, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by BearsFan315 View Post
My Terrain has been burning oil i assume, have to put in a quart about every 1500 miles.

this morning i went to check oil and pulled the oil fill cap.

i pulled the hose and cleaned it out, poured out all the brown goop from the airbox section where it connects.



To remedy the possibility of a blown main seal, you light try one of these.
It won't do anything for oil consumption, but it will relieve crank case pressure.
There are other "oil breathers" as well. . so shop around. ZZP and some others.



https://www.ebay.com/itm/Billet-Alum...53.m2749.l2649

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post #4 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-02-2018, 06:37 PM
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post #5 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-02-2018, 08:42 PM
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Not really. These heaters are often stuck to the oil pan and are good for getting the oil "warm" in engines that use high viscosity oil like a diesel. At 150 watts it will only put out a little over 500 BTUs of heat.

I've seen these used a lot on farm equipment and big trucks. Those engines are diesel powered and as such typically use something like 15W-40 oil. When it gets really cold that weight oil is super thick and doesn't want to circulate properly, so one of these heaters (maybe) coupled with a block heater is really useful.

Gasoline engines (with heaters) normally have a freeze plug style heater. They are rated at 400-600 watts and are designed to warm the water inside the block.

The main advantages of a block heater is that it allows the engine to get up to temp quicker and since the starter is not dragging all that cold metal around will ease the amperage load on the battery when cranking.

Since most Equinoxes are using 5W-30 synthetic (or a blend) lube, the sluggish oil issue isn't a problem.

Oil temperatures of a fully warmed engine tend to run about 10 degrees warmer than the thermostat so it should be around 205 degrees.

The problem with oil temperature is that it takes a LOT longer for the oil to get hot (compared to the coolant). That is why you need to drive it about 30 minutes at speed. Get it hot and keep it hot. That will evaporate the water.
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post #6 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-03-2018, 01:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Storageguy View Post
A radiator hose heater is the method I have used on many vehicles, if you park outside. Easy, drain the coolant, cut the low radiator hose, insert, clamp, and then route the electical plug out the front of your grill and secure with tie straps. Refill your coolant tank.

The GM Oil Consumption is more than 1 qt every 2k miles, so you would qualify. The work also includes new timing chains and guides.

A catch can will prevent your air box and line from building up and freezing, and the block heater will keep your coolant warm and may prevent the orrifice in the head from freezing.
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post #7 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-03-2018, 08:40 AM
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A catch can will prevent your air box and line from building up and freezing, and the block heater will keep your coolant warm and may prevent the orrifice in the head from freezing.
An oil catch on the 2.4L can will do little to nothing to prevent PCV freezing or clogging. That is misinformation.

Also, idling the 2.4L longer to "clear the line" and PCV orifice in cold weather will not do enough to eliminate any significant amount of moisture in the PCV path. Crankcase water vapor builds up in cold or humid weather. Only long extended periods of engine operation and heat from it will burn off excessive crankcase water vapor build up.


A heater may help , but one real problem is a low spot in the fresh air tube going to the air plenum. Correcting that low spot in the fresh air tube by replacing it also may remedy a large part of crankcase condensates from clogging that line. To be honest, the PCV in the 2.4L is a poor design in and very cold weather a vented oil breather cap has been found to be more effective if the PCV or intake tube does get clogged with gummy oil or frozen.
https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engi...tml#post274269


https://www.equinoxforum.net/10-gene...tml#post219273

2015 Equinox LTZ 3.6L FWD Champagne Silver Metallic *Build Date 1-08-2015 * *34,465 miles 3-11-2019

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post #8 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-03-2018, 11:51 PM
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An oil catch on the 2.4L can will do little to nothing to prevent PCV freezing or clogging. That is misinformation.

Also, idling the 2.4L longer to "clear the line" and PCV orifice in cold weather will not do enough to eliminate any significant amount of moisture in the PCV path. Crankcase water vapor builds up in cold or humid weather. Only long extended periods of engine operation and heat from it will burn off excessive crankcase water vapor build up.


A heater may help , but one real problem is a low spot in the fresh air tube going to the air plenum. Correcting that low spot in the fresh air tube by replacing it also may remedy a large part of crankcase condensates from clogging that line. To be honest, the PCV in the 2.4L is a poor design in and very cold weather a vented oil breather cap has been found to be more effective if the PCV or intake tube does get clogged with gummy oil or frozen.
https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engi...tml#post274269


https://www.equinoxforum.net/10-gene...tml#post219273
This is not disinformation. The catch can will eliminate the poorly designed downward sloping of the tube toward the reservoir in the air intake. It collects the oil and water before it makes its way to the reservoir which is also poorly design with the input near the bottom instead of the top. The catch can has the input on the top and output also on the top, thus the reason they call it a catch can. All the driving in the world will not eliminate the build-up in the stock reservoir. The water will freeze in the catch can but it will not block venting of the crankcase, unless it also becomes filled.

The crankcase vents through the intake oriffice, through the fresh air intake from the valve cover and as a last resort through vent holes in the seals themselves. If the both the intake and fresh are are frozen shut the chances of the seals being dislodged is likely.

For those who are contemplating putting in a vented fill cap. Don't do it. It works on older, non EFI engines, but doing so on the Ecotec will cause severe lean conditions. I tried unscrewing the filler cap halfway and saw the fuel trim numbers skyrocket, and excessive fuel injected into the engine to compensate for the non-metered air. It did not cause a misfire or any other noticeable change. A check valve may work but, personally I don't want to experiment on my engine to figure out how much backpressure is needed to open the valve before it compromises the crankshaft seal.

Attached is photo of the simple oil/water separator that I installed on my car. The upper tube and reservoir remains dry and clean, as well as the throttle body. Some owners of ecotec engines have reported throttle body freezing in cold weather as well.
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post #9 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-03-2018, 11:56 PM
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Jegs Oil Separator, cost about $50 including all fittings and hose.
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post #10 of 62 (permalink) Old 12-04-2018, 06:43 AM
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GM has a Service Bulletin SB-10057077-8108 March 2015 covering the PCV issue for those who are concerned. https://gm.oemdtc.com/Recall/SB-10057977-8108.pdf
It officially discusses this and what should be done. Coverage is for 10 years and 120,000 miles on vehicles specified. There may also be an updated Bulletin so need to check for latest. https://gm.oemdtc.com/1899/special-c...-chevrolet-gmc
For those interested in using a vented Oil Cap with check valve,
https://www.c-f-m.com/performancepar...2L-766p212.htm
This breather is the ONLY one in the market which incorporates a check ball to keep unmetered air from coming through while the crankcase is under vacuum.
This is used on the Camaro and does NOT cause lean fuel trims like simply removing the oil cap.
it should not cause any issue with fuel trims because air flow is allowed only out of the crankcase (not into) under any condition where the PCV path may become clogged. This will prevent blowing out rear engine main seals.

A small external catch can carries the danger of becoming full and or also becoming clogged with frozen condensates.

Also, we have seen no evidence of any small hole in engine oil seals that will "let excess pressure out". More likely, under excess crankcase pressure, air would be forced out around the main seal. It is designed with a accordion like bellowed lip which would allow pressure to escape up to a point. But it would also likely damage it and begin to allow crank oil flow out of the engine.
Link to another recent discussion on this - - : https://www.equinoxforum.net/31-engi...tml#post274909

There is even a GM Service Bulletin covering it . . https://gm.oemdtc.com/1899/special-c...-chevrolet-gmc
In part it reads - - -
*-
Copyright 2015
General Motors. All Rights Reserved.
Service Bulletin
Bulletin No.: Date: 1 4882
March 2015
SPECIAL COVERAGE
SUBJECT:
Special Coverage Adjustment

Plugged PCV Orifice in Intake Manifold

2013 GMC Terrain vehicles equipped with a 2.4L engine

(LAF, LEA or LUK) that have experienced high oil consumption may also experience a frozen and/or plugged
PCV(positive crankcase ventilation) system during cold weather operation. This condition may increase crankcase pressure leading to a rear crankshaft seal oil leak.
If the oil leak is ignored or not noticed, an engine clatter noise may be noticeable and/or the engine pressure warning light may illuminate.
If this condition is not corrected, continued driving with engine
noise and/or the engine oil pressure light illuminated may damage the engine.


2015 Equinox LTZ 3.6L FWD Champagne Silver Metallic *Build Date 1-08-2015 * *34,465 miles 3-11-2019

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