Catch can - TerrainForum.net: GMC Terrain Forum
 18Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 35 (permalink) Old 03-09-2018, 06:29 PM Thread Starter
Jr. Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 43
Catch can

2.4L 2014 Terrain

chose this can cause I could open it to add steel wool for condensing, and a 'straw' to either suck it to the bottom so fumes have to rise through steel wool, or suck it down through the steel wool and up straw. I didnt keep track of which hole i had the straw in. It was 3/8" nylon water line I drilled several holes in bottom half.
It slip fits inside either fitting in the lid. I put silicone all around the line before final insert.
This lid was also nice as I could remount it with a better choice of orientation of the inlet/outlet fittings.

Cheapest can on amazon was welded, so this was best 2nd choice for me.

Toughest part was the #8 x 1/2" self drilling screws I used to mount to vehicle.
Put masking tape on screw head so it stayed put in the 1/4" socket I used my hex impact with a hex to 1/4 drive adapter to spin them in.

I used the brass plumbing inserts to keep the original 'pipe' from crushing with the clamps.
Personally, i dont feel the clamps are required. The supplied blue hose was a very firm press to get over the original pipe. I would use the clamps at the fittings on the can though.

reverting, just use the supplied blue line as a coupler to rejoin the original pipe.

Ill need to add some 1/2" peel and stick foam insulation strip on back of can to keep can from jiggling.

Otherwise - allow a half hour/1 beer install once you have everything together.

Occurred to me to blow air through it first to ensure no bits loose getting sucked into engine.
Pulled the blue lines off and blew 90psi through inlet/outlet. Nothing came out but ymmv.
reassembled with peace of mind.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg catch 1 - 1.jpg (242.7 KB, 80 views)
File Type: jpg catch 2 - 1.jpg (252.0 KB, 75 views)
File Type: jpg catch 3 - 1.jpg (286.2 KB, 62 views)
File Type: jpg catch 4 - 1.jpg (134.4 KB, 62 views)
File Type: jpg catch 5 - 1.jpg (166.7 KB, 71 views)
File Type: jpg catch 6 - 1.jpg (296.8 KB, 71 views)
File Type: jpg catch 7 - 1.jpg (315.1 KB, 82 views)
ThreeNox likes this.

Last edited by 2016eq; 03-09-2018 at 06:42 PM.
2016eq is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 35 (permalink) Old 03-09-2018, 09:48 PM
Theta GOD!
 
JayTee2014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 5,064
Garage
I doubt you will see much collected in the catch can the way you have it installed on a 2.4L. . . unless you do a lot of WOT or driving down steep inclines (high vacuum conditions).

The 2.4L engine has an internal PCV valve that allows air and blow-by vapors to be drawn from the crankcase into the intake manifold. That is the "dirt side" where a catch can is most useful and traditionally installed. It also is the source of valve coking and carbon build up.

The place you installed that catch can is the "clean side" which may catch some moisture in cold weather with a bit of oil vapor occasionally. But will not prevent intake manifold oil contamination, valve coking, and main oil seal blow out if the internal PCV valve freezes like it is prone to do.

2019 GMC Acadia SLT-1 3.6L LGX V6 - Build Date: 4-11-2019 - Bought 6-22-2019

SOLD - - 2015 Equinox LTZ 3.6L FWD Champagne Silver Metallic *Build Date 1-08-2015 *

SOLD with *38,865 miles 8-15-2019.

Last edited by JayTee2014; 03-09-2018 at 10:04 PM.
JayTee2014 is offline  
post #3 of 35 (permalink) Old 03-09-2018, 10:07 PM Thread Starter
Jr. Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 43
the line I cut has oily residue with fuel smell inside.
drops came out of the line after I cut it
will see I guess what comes of it over the next weeks.

sucks if it doesnt do something

thanks for the heads up.
JayTee2014 likes this.
2016eq is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 35 (permalink) Old 03-09-2018, 10:30 PM
Theta GOD!
 
JayTee2014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 5,064
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2016eq View Post
the line I cut has oily residue with fuel smell inside.
drops came out of the line after I cut it
will see I guess what comes of it over the next weeks.

sucks if it doesnt do something

thanks for the heads up.
EDIT: - - BTW . . the thread you were reading "PCV Valve Locations" is old and applied to the older 2.4L I4 and older 3.0L V6 engines. Disregard that as it no longer applies to your 2.4L. The PCV path has cahnged since that thread was posted. There really is no PCV "valve. . but an orifice now in both I4 and V6 engines.

No worries. It just is not where a catch can needs to be installed. There will be some amounts of water vapor especially in cooler or cold weather as well and some minimal oil vapors. But the real stuff is happening via the internal PCV orifice allowing stuff into the intake manifold.

Read Page 5 - -the thread in link as it applies to the 2.4L engine PCV routes from about 2013 onward. LINK:- http://www.equinoxforum.net/10-gener...tml#post219273


The picture below is the 3.6L LFX engine that has been used in Equinox/Terrain and cars like the Camaro roughly from 2010 to 2017. The Blue line and arrow indicates the "Clean Side" fresh air supply into one of the valve covers on this engine and supplies metered and filtered air into the crankcase. This is the equivalent path where you installed the catch can.
The upper Red line and arrow represents the "Dirty Side" flow of crankcase blowby gases and vapors which are routed from the other V6 valve cover to the 90 degree fitting shown on the top of the intake manifold in the picture. Those blow-by gases and water vapor from combustion products are what contaminates the inside of the intake manifold and then passes those vapors onto the back side of the intake valves and into the combustion chamber to burn up and reduce pollution, instead of venting them to atmosphere as was done with the "Oil Breather" pipe on older engines.

The place you installed the catch can is the clean air side allowing air into the 2.4L valve cover and eventually the crankcase. Yes, there may be some nominal back flow that occurs there under some conditions.
However, the Red path shown in the picture below on the 3.6L LFX is what is internal on the 2.4L engines and the place a catch can could really do the job had it been accessible.



Current 2.4L Four Cylinder PCV Orifice Location - - -



2019 GMC Acadia SLT-1 3.6L LGX V6 - Build Date: 4-11-2019 - Bought 6-22-2019

SOLD - - 2015 Equinox LTZ 3.6L FWD Champagne Silver Metallic *Build Date 1-08-2015 *

SOLD with *38,865 miles 8-15-2019.

Last edited by JayTee2014; 03-10-2018 at 08:51 AM.
JayTee2014 is offline  
post #5 of 35 (permalink) Old 03-10-2018, 03:48 PM
Theta GOD!
 
JayTee2014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 5,064
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2016eq View Post
I cut it
will see I guess what comes of it over the next weeks.

.
Keep us posted. ..

2019 GMC Acadia SLT-1 3.6L LGX V6 - Build Date: 4-11-2019 - Bought 6-22-2019

SOLD - - 2015 Equinox LTZ 3.6L FWD Champagne Silver Metallic *Build Date 1-08-2015 *

SOLD with *38,865 miles 8-15-2019.
JayTee2014 is offline  
post #6 of 35 (permalink) Old 03-17-2018, 06:39 PM Thread Starter
Jr. Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 43
Well. Absolutely nothing. Can and hoses are totally clean.
$10for a new and clean OEM pvc pipe, and the catch can will be coming out.

Just had a p015a code, slow upstream o2 sensor response. Poss bad o2 sensor.
Doubt itís related. Will clear code after removal and address the o2 sensor if the code returns after.

Will update if there is anything new, but suspect this is it.
JayTee2014 likes this.
2016eq is offline  
post #7 of 35 (permalink) Old 06-08-2018, 06:19 AM
Jr. Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 8
I recently installed a catch can on my 2012 Equinox w/ 2.4L w/115,000 miles. The hook up from the OPs pics looks right, BUT you need to put the catch can lower than than the outlet coming from the valve cover. How you have it set up isn't going to fix anything. When your engine cools, all the condensation is going to run right back down into the intake PCV passage. I installed my catch can so it's a down hill run from the valve cover to the can. I checked it after 3000 miles and it was nearly FULL of an oil/water/gas mixture. So I'm going to start checking it every 2000 miles.

The stock air box has what you might call a catch reservoir built into it (right where the PCV hose goes in), but it can fill up and seep right back down into the valve cover (which I suspect is the main problem with this design). Remove the air box, sit it on its side and see how much crap drains out. I did this before I installed the catch can, and cleaned it out.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg AirBox.jpg (1.35 MB, 60 views)
File Type: jpg Oil catch 1.jpg (1.39 MB, 63 views)
File Type: jpg Oil catch 2.jpg (1.37 MB, 57 views)
File Type: jpg Oil catch 3.jpg (1.22 MB, 53 views)
ThreeNox likes this.
EricJ is offline  
post #8 of 35 (permalink) Old 06-19-2018, 10:16 PM
Jr. Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricJ View Post
I recently installed a catch can on my 2012 Equinox w/ 2.4L w/115,000 miles. The hook up from the OPs pics looks right, BUT you need to put the catch can lower than than the outlet coming from the valve cover. How you have it set up isn't going to fix anything. When your engine cools, all the condensation is going to run right back down into the intake PCV passage. I installed my catch can so it's a down hill run from the valve cover to the can. I checked it after 3000 miles and it was nearly FULL of an oil/water/gas mixture. So I'm going to start checking it every 2000 miles.

The stock air box has what you might call a catch reservoir built into it (right where the PCV hose goes in), but it can fill up and seep right back down into the valve cover (which I suspect is the main problem with this design). Remove the air box, sit it on its side and see how much crap drains out. I did this before I installed the catch can, and cleaned it out.
Agree on that. I have yet to install mine.
Reason for quoting your post was about the reservoir built in, if an aftermarket intake is installed, there is no longer a factory catch in place, a catch can as you described, installed BELOW the inlets/outlets would be a must assuming gm put one in the intake for a reason.
Tankmalone is offline  
post #9 of 35 (permalink) Old 06-20-2018, 09:14 AM
Theta GOD!
 
JayTee2014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 5,064
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricJ View Post
I recently installed a catch can on my 2012 Equinox w/ 2.4L w/115,000 miles. The hook up from the OPs pics looks right, BUT you need to put the catch can lower than than the outlet coming from the valve cover. How you have it set up isn't going to fix anything. When your engine cools, all the condensation is going to run right back down into the intake PCV passage. I installed my catch can so it's a down hill run from the valve cover to the can. I checked it after 3000 miles and it was nearly FULL of an oil/water/gas mixture. So I'm going to start checking it every 2000 miles.

The stock air box has what you might call a catch reservoir built into it (right where the PCV hose goes in), but it can fill up and seep right back down into the valve cover (which I suspect is the main problem with this design). Remove the air box, sit it on its side and see how much crap drains out. I did this before I installed the catch can, and cleaned it out.



If you are getting that much in the air inlet side of the PCV path, it may be an indication that the PCV orifice in the cylinder head is clogged with carbon as shown in an earlier posting here. The picture with a drill bit being used to clear it.There is a TSB on this. If you are collecting that much, then PCV air flow may be pressurized from blow-by and moving in the wrong direction. A catch can in a normally operating PCV path needs to be installed downside from the PCV valve or orifice. Not upstream in the fresh air inlet side. That is where you installed it.

If that PCV orifice is clogged or reduce in it's opening size, it could cause a main seal to blow out on the crank shaft.

With 115,000 miles on it, I would bet the PCV orifice is at least partially clogged. There should not be that much oil/water vapor flow in that direction to the catch can you installed. That line is an air Inlet to the crankcase via that line. Not a PCV vapor Outlet to the air plenum.
bigb12359, 13nox, EricJ and 1 others like this.

2019 GMC Acadia SLT-1 3.6L LGX V6 - Build Date: 4-11-2019 - Bought 6-22-2019

SOLD - - 2015 Equinox LTZ 3.6L FWD Champagne Silver Metallic *Build Date 1-08-2015 *

SOLD with *38,865 miles 8-15-2019.

Last edited by JayTee2014; 06-20-2018 at 09:19 AM.
JayTee2014 is offline  
post #10 of 35 (permalink) Old 06-20-2018, 05:19 PM
Jr. Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayTee2014 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricJ View Post
I recently installed a catch can on my 2012 Equinox w/ 2.4L w/115,000 miles. The hook up from the OPs pics looks right, BUT you need to put the catch can lower than than the outlet coming from the valve cover. How you have it set up isn't going to fix anything. When your engine cools, all the condensation is going to run right back down into the intake PCV passage. I installed my catch can so it's a down hill run from the valve cover to the can. I checked it after 3000 miles and it was nearly FULL of an oil/water/gas mixture. So I'm going to start checking it every 2000 miles.

The stock air box has what you might call a catch reservoir built into it (right where the PCV hose goes in), but it can fill up and seep right back down into the valve cover (which I suspect is the main problem with this design). Remove the air box, sit it on its side and see how much crap drains out. I did this before I installed the catch can, and cleaned it out.



If you are getting that much in the air inlet side of the PCV path, it may be an indication that the PCV orifice in the cylinder head is clogged with carbon as shown in an earlier posting here. The picture with a drill bit being used to clear it.There is a TSB on this. If you are collecting that much, then PCV air flow may be pressurized from blow-by and moving in the wrong direction. A catch can in a normally operating PCV path needs to be installed downside from the PCV valve or orifice. Not upstream in the fresh air inlet side. That is where you installed it.

If that PCV orifice is clogged or reduce in it's opening size, it could cause a main seal to blow out on the crank shaft.

With 115,000 miles on it, I would bet the PCV orifice is at least partially clogged. There should not be that much oil/water vapor flow in that direction to the catch can you installed. That line is an air Inlet to the crankcase via that line. Not a PCV vapor Outlet to the air plenum.
Any links on how to remove the intake manifold? Only thing I was able to find mentioned disassembling the ac lines in order to remove the intake manifold...
Tankmalone is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the TerrainForum.net: GMC Terrain Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome